#1 2017-10-31 08:58:16

http://high-street.org/uploads/165_2017-10-31_0857.png

Click, click, boom!

Offline

 

#2 2017-10-31 13:35:39

When they built the Alaskan Pipeline between Prudhoe Bay and the Arctic Circle, there are sections where the permafrost is so solid they had to have it come out of the ground and run along the highway.  Being good environmentalists, they made sure that there were sections that went up ten feet in the air for about 10 yards and then back to the normal height of around six feet above the ground so the deer, caribou, etc. would feel comfortable crossing underneath.

Some time later, two workers were driving along the Dalton Highway checking the pipeline, when they noticed a buck, ducking his head, and walking under the six foot high section.

Offline

 

#3 2017-10-31 14:40:40

I thought those periodic pipeline vertical sections were to handle the thermal expansion of the horizontal sections, giving it room to flex without buckling.  (Edit, and to allow truck access)

Here in Florida we spent $10mil adding underpasses to a new highway that ran through bear territory, so the bears can migrate under the road. Installed numerous infrared cameras for monitoring. In 5 years they have failed to catch a single bear using an underpass. Tagged bears have been shown to go more than 4 miles along the fence to cut across the road at access roads and in town.

Last edited by GooberMcNutly (2017-10-31 14:43:54)

Offline

 

#4 2017-10-31 15:02:16

I think about stuff like this when I hear that scientists are considering spraying particles into the upper atmosphere in an effort to manage climate and reduce global warming. Or introduce a new species to eradicate another species which should never have introduced. Or design new species of life through genetic engineering. What could go wrong?

"Don't worry, Ma'am; we're scientists."

Online

 

#5 2017-10-31 16:15:18

Smudge wrote:

"Don't worry, Ma'am; we're government scientists."

Offline

 

#6 2017-11-01 20:36:00

GooberMcNutly wrote:

I thought those periodic pipeline vertical sections were to handle the thermal expansion of the horizontal sections, giving it room to flex without buckling.  (Edit, and to allow truck access)

The pipeline runs along the highway, not over it, and occasionally it runs up to a pumping station to reheat and re-pressure the oil and then back down to the road.  Between the Arctic Circle and Fairbanks, it's almost completely underground.

Offline

 

#7 2017-11-02 09:03:39

I've seen a good bit of it up close. I meant truck access under it to leave the road. But mostly in order to allow it to thermally cycle without buckling. The radiators on the pylons are the neatest part, pulling out heat from the ground to keep them from melting the permafrost. It's an interesting way to solve that problem.

Offline

 

#8 2017-11-02 12:29:37

GooberMcNutly wrote:

Smudge wrote:

"Don't worry, Ma'am; we're government scientists."

"and we are here to help"

Offline

 

Board footer

high-street.org