#251 2017-04-12 23:34:57

Emmeran wrote:

Sorry but Fargo the Movie was awesome - why would I ever watch a knock off series?  And fuck y'all I think I'm the only one here to ever live up on the Bakken.

Three reasons. First two are these clowns.

http://high-street.org/sidepic/milton.office.space.pnghttp://high-street.org/sidepic/baddersanta.jpg

Third reason is the writing is superb, credible fiction.

The second season's plotting took it entirely off the rails.

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#252 2017-04-12 23:52:27

When thinking of the classics, I tender:

Last edited by JetRx (2017-04-12 23:56:55)

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#253 2017-04-13 10:12:09

http://68.media.tumblr.com/85c6f42386a1e027e34ae604f9d14d1b/tumblr_oo9h55ZmwA1r5fwoio1_400.png

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#254 2017-04-13 20:38:09

Emmeran wrote:

Sorry but Fargo the Movie was awesome - why would I ever watch a knock off series?  And fuck y'all I think I'm the only one here to ever live up on the Bakken.

As usual, you have no idea what you're talking about.  I loved Fargo too but the TV Series is so fucking weird it makes Fargo look like National Lampoon's Brutal Murders.

Oh, and the Coen brothers are Executive Producers.

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#255 2017-04-13 21:05:51

Baywolfe wrote:

Emmeran wrote:

Sorry but Fargo the Movie was awesome - why would I ever watch a knock off series?  And fuck y'all I think I'm the only one here to ever live up on the Bakken.

As usual, you have no idea what you're talking about.  I loved Fargo too but the TV Series is so fucking weird it makes Fargo look like National Lampoon's Brutal Murders.

Oh, and the Coen brothers are Executive Producers.

Of course I don't - I'm objecting on principle.  Fuckers need to come up with a new concept, tired of idea reruns. 

Yeah I feel for them, being creative is such a hard fucking thing to do - lazy pieces of shit.

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#256 2017-04-13 21:06:14

Baywolfe wrote:

Not sure they can recapture lighting in a bottle, but I wish them well.  There have certainly been enough modern B Movies to keep them going for a while.

Patton Oswalt is involved...Don't know if you consider that a good or a bad thing.

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#257 2017-04-13 21:12:11

Smudge wrote:

I also came clean about the fact that I'm infatuated with Rachel Keller

Aubrey Plaza is always fun to watch and made some serious hay from that role. She provided the only genuine jolts I experienced during the series.
Rachel Keller is like a goddamn force of nature.  I kept thinking she looked familiar while watching Legion, but it was several eps before it clicked that I had seen her in Fargo S2.  They're such completely different characters--yet she inhabits both so completely.  I have a feeling that you will have many future opportunities to indulge that infatuation.

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#258 2017-04-13 22:09:11

George Orr wrote:

Baywolfe wrote:

Not sure they can recapture lighting in a bottle, but I wish them well.  There have certainly been enough modern B Movies to keep them going for a while.

Patton Oswalt is involved...Don't know if you consider that a good or a bad thing.

So is Joel Hodgson and that's ten times more important.

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#259 2017-04-13 22:28:51

George Orr wrote:

Smudge wrote:

I also came clean about the fact that I'm infatuated with Rachel Keller

Aubrey Plaza is always fun to watch and made some serious hay from that role. She provided the only genuine jolts I experienced during the series.
Rachel Keller is like a goddamn force of nature.  I kept thinking she looked familiar while watching Legion, but it was several eps before it clicked that I had seen her in Fargo S2.  They're such completely different characters--yet she inhabits both so completely.  I have a feeling that you will have many future opportunities to indulge that infatuation.



I guess I owe you a sum up (I watched the final episode last night). I'm ambivalent. There's a thin plot (and the plot is definitely the weak point) but...how critical can I be? It's a comic book story, and I knew that going in.

Some of it was really cheesy (I could have lived without the guy who lived in the ice cube altogether). But the production had moments of real creativity (like the Bollywood dance scene, or the later scene with Lenny dancing to Nina Simone, above). I might check out the new season; it depends on the what the competition is doing.

I'm a very opinionated person; I don't normally walk down the middle of the road. But in this case, I'm going to punt, and put off a final decision. I'd watch a couple more episodes to see if they are able to tighten it up; they earned that much commitment from me. I guess that means I liked it a bit more than you did.

Of course, having a crush on two separate actresses in the show makes it an easier choice.

Last edited by Smudge (2017-04-13 23:08:44)

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#260 2017-04-13 23:19:03

However..."Quarry" was far and away my favorite new show of the year. It's set in 1972, when I was half way through high school. And they absolutely nailed it, the mood of the times.

Sorry for the subs (I don't think they can be turned off) but the price is right. I think the whole season might be available on YouTube.

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#261 2017-04-17 13:21:24

I binge watched the second season of Fargo yesterday, finishing up the last couple of episodes this morning. What an awesome piece of story telling. The Coen Brothers hand was subtly visible throughout. The story had a lot in common with Blood Simple, the first Coen Brothers film, which I suspect a lot of people missed because they weren't well known yet when it was made. If you don't know Blood Simple, I recommend you find it and watch it.

I'll try again on the first season at some point. And I understand the third season is just about to begin airing.

Thanks for the tip, George.

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#262 2017-04-17 14:33:50

Smudge wrote:

I binge watched the second season of Fargo yesterday, finishing up the last couple of episodes this morning. What an awesome piece of story telling. The Coen Brothers hand was subtly visible throughout. The story had a lot in common with Blood Simple, the first Coen Brothers film, which I suspect a lot of people missed because they weren't well known yet when it was made. If you don't know Blood Simple, I recommend you find it and watch it.

I'll try again on the first season at some point. And I understand the third season is just about to begin airing.

Thanks for the tip, George.

Have you caught all the references between Season 1 and Season 2?  There's more to come in the last few episodes of 2.  Pay attention to something Hanzee Dent says near the end, which appears to foreshadow the Fargo Mob in Season 1.

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#263 2017-04-17 14:58:14

No, I haven't watched Season 1 yet; I'm doing them out of sequence. Let's see if I can put it together later even though I watch them in reverse order.

Last edited by Smudge (2017-04-17 14:59:47)

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#264 2017-04-17 18:11:02

Might even be easier since you're actually watching them in chronological order.

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#265 2017-04-17 21:11:42

Huh.  I had no idea.

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#266 2017-04-21 09:17:58

Just finished the season finale of The Expanse last night. Have been impressed with the technical aspects of the show and the characters play their parts quite well. It's a little more dramatically oriented than the novels, but what show isn't? The special effects are top notch, of course, more "real space" than anything I've seen since the 2001 Space Odyssey series of films.

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#267 2017-04-25 13:57:54

Um...



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#268 2017-04-27 15:49:36

As a result of a conversation with Baywolfe, I found the entire run of "A Nero Wolfe Mystery", which starred  Timothy Hutton and Maury Chaykin, and ran on A&E in 2001-02. I finished the final installment last night. For pure, simple fun, it doesn't get much better than this for a devoted mystery fan. I would rate these stories on a par with the Hercule Poirot Mysteries, starring David Suchet, which ran on PBS for many years (another favorite series of mine).

Thanks for reminding me about these, Baywolfe. This are a rare American made television mystery series which can stand up to, and compare favorably with what the Brits do with regularity. And that's actually quite a compliment.

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#269 2017-04-27 18:49:19

De Nada.  I agree, if there were a international mystery competition Nero Wolfe is one of the ones we'd enter.

Now it's time to check out the Sherlock Holmes series by Grenada Television (1984 - 1994) starring the late, greats Jeremy Brett as Sherlock Holmes and Edward Hardwicke as Dr. Watson.  Very faithful to the Conan Doyle stories.

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#270 2017-04-27 21:49:08

Yes, I have the whole set of those, and have watched them many times.

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#271 2017-04-27 22:05:07

I do too, although they just re-released them on Blu Ray and did a very nice clean up job on the prints.  They're in my "Hey family, buy me this shit" list on Amazon.

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#272 2017-04-28 03:23:32

This-

Last edited by choad (2017-04-28 11:55:08)

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#273 2017-04-28 09:04:15

nfidelbastard wrote:

This-

You have to use the embed tag.

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#274 2017-04-28 09:10:32

Smudge wrote:

Yes, I have the whole set of those, and have watched them many times.

How about the Ellery Queen Mysteries (197576) starring Timothy Hutton's daddy, Jim Hutton?  Also starring David Wayne as his father, Inspector Richard Queen, Tom Reese as Sgt. Velie, and John Hillerman as Simon Brimmer AKA the guy that always gets the deduction wrong?  They also run through the Love Boat group of former TV and Movie stars most of whom are long dead now.

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#275 2017-04-28 09:53:12

Wow...never even heard of the Ellery Queen Mysteries. I'll see if I can hunt them down. Thanks, guys (both of the last two posts) for the tips. The trick isn't finding stuff to watch; It's in finding the occasional gems which lurk in the matrix of mediocrity.

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#276 2017-04-28 11:57:58

nfidelbastard wrote:

This-

Huh, Purgatory has a Whole Foods.

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#277 2017-04-28 12:28:08

Baywolfe wrote:

You have to use the embed tag.

Thanks for the info. I posted the old way and it seemed to work in the preview but now I'm better informed. Thank you Choad for repairing it.

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#278 2017-04-28 22:38:35

Smudge wrote:

The trick isn't finding stuff to watch; It's in finding the occasional gems which lurk in the matrix of mediocrity.

Have you found Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries?  There's three seasons on Netflix.  It's an Australian production.  My sister turned me on to the books (which are a good deal racier) but I thoroughly enjoyed this series.  You might, too, if you're a mystery buff.

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#279 2017-04-28 23:04:33

Thanks for the tip, George. I've twice started the series, and gotten two or three episodes in, and then lost interest. I'm not sure what puts me off, but something does. I will say that there are very few Australian productions which I've enjoyed. There's something in their aesthetic which I find jarring, I think. But thanks for the tip anyway.

Let me give you a gift. Here's a site which I stumbled on a couple of years ago, and, well...if it were a book, the pages would be falling out. I've utilized it that much. I've been tempted to write the site owner just to let him know how much benefit I've received as a result of his efforts. He really has done a spectacular job of pulling a half century's worth of crime drama into a single spot.

http://timbarron.net/entertainment/brit … mysteries/

That's a best single source or catalog of British detective (and all of the related genres) that I've ever discovered, and I've probably seen at least a couple of episodes of between 80-90 percent of the shows, and in many cases, I've watched the whole run. I hope you are able to get some use out of it (and, obviously, everyone else who reads this as well).

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#280 2017-05-15 14:41:58

I started "Taboo" last night and watched a couple of episodes; excellent cast, and an interesting dramatic setup which should allow for the story to fork out in numerous directions. Top notch production values throughout, and the cast includes Oona Chaplin (Charlie Chaplin's granddaughter) who's always interesting to watch. Too bad there are only eight episodes, but they have already committed to a second season. I have no problem recommending this, based on what I've seen so far:



http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3647998/

Edit: I've finished the series. I double down on my recommendation. Excellent production values throughout; and superb acting across the board. The show's VERY dark (incest, cannibalism and mass murder of slaves are just a few of the topics engaged) so it won't be for everyone. But I found it to be exciting and captivating. I eagerly await the second season.

Last edited by Smudge (2017-05-17 15:56:31)

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#281 2017-05-15 14:57:37

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#282 2017-05-25 00:09:18

https://high-street.org/sidepic/planteyeballs.png


TV5 - Invisible Nature, episodes s01e01-03

A soothing walk among our ever more adaptable friends in the plant kingdom and an intriguing look at their unsung ability to hear, smell, taste, touch, see and talk to one another.

Available on mvgroup.

Last edited by choad (2017-06-05 16:10:41)

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#283 2017-06-02 11:34:17

This only ran for one season, so it obviously didn't grab the public's imagination. But I found it to be an absolutely riveting spy drama. If you like the genre, check out Rubicon. Top of the stack production values throughout the series:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1389371/

(I found and downloaded the series using bit torrent. I don't know where else you would be likely to find this somewhat obscure series.)

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#284 2017-06-07 01:27:41

I watched the last episode of season two of Billions this evening. I'd have a hard time deciding if I like Billions or Mr. Robot as the best new series of the last couple years. Luckily for me, I can watch them both. If you haven't caught Billions yet, you owe it to yourself. It's a masterpiece of a show.

Season One



http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4270492/

Season Two

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#285 2017-06-16 13:02:44

I have now watched seasons one and two of Fargo in their entirety, and have started watching season three. It's a very well done TV program, based on the very well done Coen Brother's film of the same name.

I was curious about a plot aspect of season two (won't say what, because spoilers, but it involves something overhead in the sky during several scenes) and I learned that NONE of the stories are actually based on real crimes.

Maybe this is well known to others, and I'm just slow to get the message, but I feel like a guy who's just learned that there is no Santa Clause. If you weren't aware about Santa being fake, sorry to have spoiled it for you.

http://www.sbs.com.au/guide/article/201 … true-story

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#286 2017-06-16 13:31:57

I'm more interested in what you're reading.

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#287 2017-06-16 14:32:54

Emmeran wrote:

I'm more interested in what you're reading.

And you are looking for this in a thread titled "What Are You Watching?"

-----

I can't remember the last time I picked up and read an actual physical book (you know, made of pulp, with covers, etc.). I had a job where I drove a lot for a while, and I listened to audio books while I drove. I used to muse to myself about whether there is something special about running your eyes over the words on a page, or whether listening to them was just as good. And is it okay to say "I read that," when you, in fact, only listened to it? I never came to any firm conclusions on those philosophical points. But I absorbed hundreds of books in that fashion.

The last book I can remember reading in physical form was "Guns, Germs and Steel", which I've read several times, and which I originally received as a gift. It broadly explores the questions of why Europeans were the first of earth's many populations to gain enough advantage over everyone else that they could colonize the world. The answer, if I were to sum it up in my own words, was "geography becomes destiny". Not all land masses are equal, and it's not even close.

Most of the books I read/listened to were mysteries and spy novels. Most complex topics, unless I found them personally fascinating and gripping, were simply too hard to follow, integrate and remember, with some large part of my mind focused on driving. But I did enjoy a number of scholastic oriented "books" which were actually the lectures from college courses recorded and bundled into an audio book format (The Great Learning Series, or something like that. I found an open directory that had hundreds of courses, and I listened to lots of them until one day it suddenly shut down). The one which I enjoyed the most was about the history of the English language. There was another where a prize winning physicist explained what we knew about energy, and solar, and global warming, and I found it to be as interesting or thrilling as any mystery.

I took in all of Agatha Christie's mysteries, and all of Rex Stout's. I "read" every single John LeCarre novel (although many of those I own in book form as well). Robert Ludlum, Daniel Silve, Graham Greene, etc.

I read more these days than I have ever done at any time in the past I'm quite sure, but it is done almost entirely on line. I suspect I spend eight hours a day or more reading. I am a generalist by nature, so my subject matter covers the range. I realize I'm opening myself up to criticism here, because, if I read that much I have no legitimate excuse for my ignorance. All I can say is "You have no idea where I was when I started, so you can't see the progress."

Last edited by Smudge (2017-06-16 15:50:11)

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#288 2017-06-17 23:36:13

Smudge wrote:

I have now watched seasons one and two of Fargo in their entirety, and have started watching season three. It's a very well done TV program, based on the very well done Coen Brother's film of the same name.

I was curious about a plot aspect of season two (won't say what, because spoilers, but it involves something overhead in the sky during several scenes) and I learned that NONE of the stories are actually based on real crimes.

Maybe this is well known to others, and I'm just slow to get the message, but I feel like a guy who's just learned that there is no Santa Clause. If you weren't aware about Santa being fake, sorry to have spoiled it for you.

http://www.sbs.com.au/guide/article/201 … true-story

There was a lady from China, I believe, that froze to death looking for the money from the original film.  Quite excellent that they tied that money to the TV series.

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#289 2017-06-18 05:39:31

Baywolfe wrote:

Smudge wrote:

Maybe this is well known to others, and I'm just slow to get the message, but I feel like a guy who's just learned that there is no Santa Clause. If you weren't aware about Santa being fake, sorry to have spoiled it for you.

http://www.sbs.com.au/guide/article/201 … true-story

There was a lady from China, I believe, that froze to death looking for the money from the original film.  Quite excellent that they tied that money to the TV series.

Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter
Kumiko is a Japanese office lady.  She's a bit off. She is obsessed with the film Fargo, and watches it over and over to get clues for finding the film's treasure.  She needles points a treasure map based on her findings and heads to the upper mid west. Even though Kumiko is presented as a documentary, it probably not as accurate as the film makers claim.  I thought it was a decent film, and I have seen it a couple of times.

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#290 2017-06-18 10:40:29

Thanks for the enlightenment.  A search finally led me here.
This is a True Story.

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#292 2017-06-18 12:03:37

Baywolfe wrote:

There was a lady from China, I believe, that froze to death looking for the money from the original film.  Quite excellent that they tied that money to the TV series.

Yes. I thought that was a nice touch too. And it also explained another mystery; why the guy had a framed ice scraper on his wall.

The references between various episodes and the original film were many. I'm sure I spotted at least a dozen, many of them quite subtle.

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#293 2017-06-18 19:07:58

Smudge wrote:

Baywolfe wrote:

There was a lady from China, I believe, that froze to death looking for the money from the original film.  Quite excellent that they tied that money to the TV series.

Yes. I thought that was a nice touch too. And it also explained another mystery; why the guy had a framed ice scraper on his wall.

The references between various episodes and the original film were many. I'm sure I spotted at least a dozen, many of them quite subtle.

There are overlaps of characters between series; there were quite a few from S1 in S2.  (Side note:  I have never loved Ted Danson more.)  A S1 character just showed up in S3 a few weeks ago, and has become an integral part of the plot.

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#294 2017-06-18 20:56:57

George Orr wrote:

A S1 character just showed up in S3 a few weeks ago, and has become an integral part of the plot.

He's easy to miss without the chainsaw.

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#295 2017-06-19 14:13:32

choad wrote:

George Orr wrote:

A S1 character just showed up in S3 a few weeks ago, and has become an integral part of the plot.

He's easy to miss without the chainsaw.

I have racked my brain, but I'll be damned if I can remember anybody with a chainsaw in season one. I've only watched four episodes of season three, so I don't think I've seen the mystery player yet, but maybe...

Last edited by Smudge (2017-06-19 14:40:42)

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#296 2017-06-20 18:10:52

Smudge wrote:

choad wrote:

George Orr wrote:

A S1 character just showed up in S3 a few weeks ago, and has become an integral part of the plot.

He's easy to miss without the chainsaw.

I have racked my brain, but I'll be damned if I can remember anybody with a chainsaw in season one.

Sorry, I went back and skimmed those episodes to find what I thought was a chainsaw was in fact a two stroke ice hole auger/stump cutter.

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#297 2017-06-20 18:17:19

LOL...

Well I do, in fact, remember one of those.

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#298 2017-06-21 17:39:34

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#299 2017-06-25 15:05:51

Okay, I finished season 3 of Fargo, and now I have to admit I'm a solid and committed fan. Count me among the group that's lobbying for a season 4.

Season 3 was my favorite of the bunch. The Coen Brothers influence (subtle in the first couple of seasons) was clearly visible in season 3. I expect that there were numerous Old Testament references and allusions which I missed because I lack the requisite knowledge. Did everyone here see "A Serious Man".

I can't be alone in noticing that the scene in the bowling alley (the guy with the kitten) was an homage to a very similar scene from The Big Lebowski?

Complex, murky, philosophical and ambivalent; Jewish mysticism meets Reservoir Dogs.

I'd say more, but, spoilers.

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#300 2017-06-25 15:26:31

Baywolfe wrote:

I started this last night. Wow...what an opening act.

I think I'll watch pretty much anything that has Ian McShane in it. Which reminds me, speaking of Ian McShane, if you haven't already seen "Deadwood" its unquestionably one the top ten television series of all time -- up there with Breaking Bad, The Wire, The Sopranos, etc. You owe it to yourself...

http://www.dvdsreleasedates.com/pictures/800/12000/Ian-McShane.jpg

Last edited by Smudge (2017-06-25 15:27:15)

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