#1 2017-12-28 11:58:23

https://www.thelocal.de/20171228/man-di … -container

Last edited by Emmeran (2017-12-28 11:58:36)

Offline

 

#2 2018-01-02 09:21:01

Good job, making sure homeless people can't take clothes out of a container designed to collect clothes for homeless people.

https://media.qcsupply.com/catalog/product/cache/1/image/475x/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/2/3/230194lg.jpg

Offline

 

#3 2018-01-02 10:25:59

GooberMcNutly wrote:

Good job, making sure homeless people can't take clothes out of a container designed to collect clothes for homeless people.

https://media.qcsupply.com/catalog/prod … 0194lg.jpg

That was my thought upon reading the story too. But we're so focused on property rights over human rights that the irony passed unnoticed.

Online

 

#4 2018-01-02 11:14:13

GooberMcNutly wrote:

Good job, making sure homeless people can't take clothes out of a container designed to collect clothes for homeless people.

Charitable organizations have fucked up charity the same way that Little League has fucked up kid's baseball.  I do see their point though, if they went to a wide open "give what you can or take what you can" approach, the no good shits of this world would just steal the clothes and sell them at thrift markets.  What really pisses me off is due to liability issues, many restaurants pour bleach over all the food they throw away in the dumpsters because they're afraid somebody will sue them if they get sick after eating the food. 

I don't know that stronger "Good Samaritan" laws would make things easier but there has to be a way to do an end-run around our worthless politicians and help these people get food and clothing.

Offline

 

#5 2018-01-02 13:46:17

The sad part is that those kinds of big steel boxes (can you imagine what one of those boxes cost? Probably $2000+ in moderate numbers with the cool paint jobs) are huge scams.

But at least someone is processing it. We only recycle about 15% of the 25 billion pounds of textile waste (probably the vast majority of that "waste" is pre-consumer). But third-world wholesalers pay $0.35 to $0.60 / pound for wearable clothes and about 1/2 that for rags ready to be reduced back to fiber for paper or other uses. Throw out a few bins, pay some ex-cons to go around and empty once a month, throw unusables back into the city dump and profit. It's the faux-charity aspect of it that grinds my gears, but when we buy 5 times as much clothing as we did in 1980 *someone* should do something with it as it has the poorest recycling rate for nearly 100% recyclable material. Just don't lie about being a charity when you are only feathering your nest and don't engineer the boxes so they kill you.

Offline

 

Board footer

high-street.org