#1 2017-05-10 02:44:23

Yeah, 34 hours of training will show him.

A Texas judge was reprimanded Monday for a Facebook comment left on a police department's Facebook page about the arrest of a black man accused of killing a white San Antonio Police Department officer.

"Time for a tree and a rope...."

In the end, the commission concluded that the judge violated a judicial cannon [sic] demanding that judges act impartially. The agency mandated that the judge take four hours of racial sensitivity training and 30 hours of judicial training.

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#2 2017-05-10 09:27:38

square wrote:

Yeah, 34 hours of training will show him.

A Texas judge was reprimanded Monday for a Facebook comment left on a police department's Facebook page about the arrest of a black man accused of killing a white San Antonio Police Department officer.

"Time for a tree and a rope...."

In the end, the commission concluded that the judge violated a judicial cannon [sic] demanding that judges act impartially. The agency mandated that the judge take four hours of racial sensitivity training and 30 hours of judicial training.

Interesting since S/A is more Hispanic than any other race.  So there probably won't be the brouhaha you'd get normally.  I still seriously doubt that this is over.

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#3 2017-05-10 09:34:52

aww fuck the lynching shit again.   You'd think that black people were the only ones ever lynched, hell they aren't even the majority of those that were & still are lynched.

Lynching is a time-honored human social activity which shows no bias to race, ethnicity, gender, age or actual guilt.

Last edited by Emmeran (2017-05-10 09:50:33)

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#4 2017-05-10 12:49:13

Emmeran wrote:

aww fuck the lynching shit again.   You'd think that black people were the only ones ever lynched, hell they aren't even the majority of those that were & still are lynched.

Lynching is a time-honored human social activity which shows no bias to race, ethnicity, gender, age or actual guilt.

Spoken like someone who has, apparently, never lived in the south ever.

As a football coach once told the media, "You don't know, and you'll never know."

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#5 2017-05-10 13:01:01

Baywolfe wrote:

Emmeran wrote:

aww fuck the lynching shit again.   You'd think that black people were the only ones ever lynched, hell they aren't even the majority of those that were & still are lynched.

Lynching is a time-honored human social activity which shows no bias to race, ethnicity, gender, age or actual guilt.

Spoken like someone who has, apparently, never lived in the south ever.

As a football coach once told the media, "You don't know, and you'll never know."

The Kurds will tell you the same thing in Turkey, the Indians and Orientals out in the western US.  The Irish after the English invasion and the Thracian's after the Romans invaded.  Name your locale and the down-trodden minority have been strung up as sport for time eternal.   It's an easy one to enjoy as there is little mess and the rope is re-usable.

Like I said:  Time-honored human social activity.

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#6 2017-05-10 13:17:37

Emmeran wrote:

Baywolfe wrote:

Emmeran wrote:

aww fuck the lynching shit again.   You'd think that black people were the only ones ever lynched, hell they aren't even the majority of those that were & still are lynched.

Lynching is a time-honored human social activity which shows no bias to race, ethnicity, gender, age or actual guilt.

Spoken like someone who has, apparently, never lived in the south ever.

As a football coach once told the media, "You don't know, and you'll never know."

The Kurds will tell you the same thing in Turkey, the Indians and Orientals out in the western US.  The Irish after the English invasion and the Thracian's after the Romans invaded.  Name your locale and the down-trodden minority have been strung up as sport for time eternal.   It's an easy one to enjoy as there is little mess and the rope is re-usable.

Like I said:  Time-honored human social activity.

See, you're taking the position that you don't know what the judge's meaning was here--what he was actually referring to.  And if you truly don't, then you are an idiot, and I know you are not an idiot.

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#7 2017-05-10 13:39:30

George Orr wrote:

See, you're taking the position that you don't know what the judge's meaning was here--what he was actually referring to.  And if you truly don't, then you are an idiot, and I know you are not an idiot.

I'm actually refusing to attach a racial ingredient to class problem that existed (supposedly) until the rule of law came into effect.  The very concept of a Judge even jokingly referring to an act that represents the absence of the rule of law is enough for me to have him tossed from the bench and disbarred - after due process of course.

This fucker has to go because he simply has no concept of the sacredness of the rule of law and due process.


(I am also against the idea of one group claiming the crime of lynching only to themselves.  This no more represents only black Americans than mass graves only represent European Jews.  The very attempt to suddenly make this a symbol of only the black racial struggle in the southern United States screams of propaganda and publicity plays.)

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#8 2017-05-10 15:15:07

There are no absolutes here, and some of Emmeran's points are certainly true (blacks are not the only group whose members have been lynched). Taken as a whole, however, I find Emmeran's comments to be insensitive, offensive and generally diversionary (arguing over small points, while ignoring larger and more important ones completely).  Obviously the judge was making a reference to an established Southern method of dealing with out of favor blacks; to lynch them. This is no different than if one were to describe the desired outcome of an argument with a Jew as "...in need of some ovens and a little gas to resolve this." You could deny the obvious connection, claiming that everybody uses ovens, and they might b gas ovens he was referring to, but who would you be fooling? The racist connotation in the judge's comments was there, it was clear, and the only way to miss it is if you wanted to.

The commission that ruled against the judge certainly understood the judge's meaning, as did the rest of us. I personally would not try to minimize the racist aspects of the judge's comments, because they are clearly present, and clearly heinous.

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#9 2017-05-10 15:30:27

Smudge wrote:

There are no absolutes here, and some of Emmeran's points are certainly true (blacks are not the only group whose members have been lynched). Taken as a whole, however, I find Emmeran's comments to be insensitive, offensive and generally diversionary (arguing over small points, while ignoring larger and more important ones completely).

"Sensitivity" is a term bandied about by Hanger-oner's, Wannabe's and Reachers.  The simple facts behind lynching remain - lynching was the answer in every civilization lacking the rule of law.  The idea that it was used more in the south or more vs blacks is mere faddish myth used to push one minority groups claims ahead of the others.  If any group worldwide were to have a claim to the atrocity of lynching it's the Gypsies.

What you are seeing now is a down play of the true issues in favor of Tweetables such as this.  The Whitewashing of history to meet current political goals defeats everything related to the purpose of understanding and preventing the repeat of history.

The truth is far more blacks in the south were killed by being dragged to death behind horses than being lynched.

Regardless of this "sensitivity" bit, this guy is an asshole less because of the racism factor but more because of his attitude towards law and his position.  The "racism" factor let him get off with a little bit of training.  The fact that a benched jurist suggested mob justice is grounds for a lifetime ban from the field of law.

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#10 2017-05-10 16:56:23

Emmeran said: ""Sensitivity" is a term bandied about by Hanger-oner's, Wannabe's and Reachers."

Are you suggesting that I'm one of those, or is it all three? Those are simply nonsense terms.

Sensitivity is a fine word, and a fine idea, and I used it correctly. If I learned that your mother died recently, I would avoid making jokes about dead mothers if I thought you were going to read them. You can fault me for that if you wish, but I consider it to be simple, basic decency. To do otherwise would be insensitive. Your comments throughout this thread have displayed a continuous insensitivity. That's your right, of course, but to try to distract from your conduct by faulting my word choice is simply silly.


Emmeran said: "The simple facts behind lynching remain - lynching was the answer in every civilization lacking the rule of law."

What has this to do about anything; we are not a society without law? The judge who made the comment about needing a tree and a rope is a representative of the law. This would be one of those small points you argue while you ignore the elephant that's shitting on the coffee table. This is a distraction.


Emmeran said: "The idea that it was used more in the south or more vs blacks is mere faddish myth used to push one minority groups claims ahead of the others."

Really? First, I doubt you can back this up with figures. Secondly, what does the quantity of lynchings in various places, or between groups have to do with the inappropriateness of the judge's comments (or yours for that matter)? You have distorted the entire subject and used it as an excuse to rant against demons in your mind. The callous way in which you discuss this (black lynchings are a faddish myth?) diminishes you -- not blacks -- you. I would think the fact that several people here have told you essentially the same thing would clue you in and open your mind to the possibility that maybe you have something to learn here.


Emmeran said: "The truth is far more blacks in the south were killed by being dragged to death behind horses than being lynched.

So what? In what way have you advanced the discussion with this distraction? The judge didn't suggest they get a horse and a rope, he suggested a tree and a rope -- a clear reference to lynching. That's why lynching was in the title of the article  -- because the judge made an overt reference to it. Not because he was drowning in political correctness; because the reference was a call to lynch.


Emmeran said: "Regardless of this "sensitivity" bit, this guy is an asshole less because of the racism factor but more because of his attitude towards law and his position.  The "racism" factor let him get off with a little bit of training.  The fact that a benched jurist suggested mob justice is grounds for a lifetime ban from the field of law."

This is a fair point, but it's also the conclusion of the panel which heard the complaint. They gave the judge 4 hours of racial sensitivity training, but 30 hours of judicial training, reflecting a similar conclusion of their part. As to whether the judge should be banned for life, I can certainly understand the sentiment you express. But since, as Baywolfe pointed out, it's the South, he would likely just be replaced by someone else with very similar values.

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#11 2017-05-10 17:45:46

There are several differences between our arguments, first and foremost is that as an individual I am driven to find the core truths to support my arguments.  My core truth here is that a man sworn to judge the law cannot do what this idiot did.  He is a Judge, there are no second chances here, he's not a junior lawyer with a lot to learn - he's a fucking Judge.  At any point in which he suggests, publicly or privately, actions outside of the law he should receive a lifetime ban.  That job is that important.

Secondly I'm obliged to accept his explanation at face value.  Before the recent rise of "Lynching = Black racism" lynching was used in many contexts and the hangman's noose was something almost every male teenager made at least once in his progression through maturity and acceptance of death as a fact.  His explanation of the use in a salsa commercial (which I recall vividly) is very weak but cannot be discounted unless disproved.  Lynching is also part of most cowboy stories (Texas) from Louis L'Amour to Clint Eastwood in Hang'em High almost all without racial implications.

Basically you are lynching him because the people involved were of a certain race.  So who is the lynch mob now?

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#12 2017-05-10 18:13:04

Emmeran said: "There are several differences between our arguments, first and foremost is that as an individual I am driven to find the core truths to support my arguments.  My core truth here is that a man sworn to judge the law cannot do what this idiot did.  He is a Judge, there are no second chances here, he's not a junior lawyer with a lot to learn - he's a fucking Judge.  At any point in which he suggests, publicly or privately, actions outside of the law he should receive a lifetime ban.  That job is that important."

Yes; I agreed with most of this, and the part about 'lifetime ban', while I wouldn't necessarily go that far, I don't challenge you on the point either. I said as much in my last post.



Emmeran said: "Secondly I'm obliged to accept his explanation at face value.  Before the recent rise of "Lynching = Black racism" lynching was used in many contexts and the hangman's noose was something almost every male teenager made at least once in his progression through maturity and acceptance of death as a fact.  His explanation of the use in a salsa commercial (which I recall vividly) is very weak but cannot be discounted unless disproved.  Lynching is also part of most cowboy stories (Texas) from Louis L'Amour to Clint Eastwood in Hang'em High almost all without racial implications.

Basically you are lynching him because the people involved were of a certain race.  So who is the lynch mob now?"

Huh?

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#13 2017-05-10 19:04:05

From the NAACP Website: HISTORY OF LYNCHINGS
Throughout the late 19th century racial tension grew throughout the United States.  More of this tension was noticeable in the Southern parts of the United States.  In the south, people were blaming their financial problems on the newly freed slaves that lived around them.  Lynchings were becoming a popular way of resolving some of the anger that whites had in relation to the free blacks.

From 1882-1968, 4,743 lynchings occurred in the United States.  Of these people that were lynched 3,446 were black.  The blacks lynched accounted for 72.7% of the people lynched.  These numbers seem large, but it is known that not all of the lynchings were ever recorded.  Out of the 4,743 people lynched only 1,297 white people were lynched.  That is only 27.3%.  Many of the whites lynched were lynched for helping the black or being anti lynching and even for domestic crimes.

I still think about some of the WWII black veterans, returning to their southern homes after the war, and receiving a welcome that none of their white counterparts received.

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#14 2017-05-10 19:23:24

Baywolfe wrote:

some of the WWII black veterans, returning to their southern homes after the war, and receiving a welcome that none of their white counterparts received.

Blogger wrote:

One of the women had her spine severed by force of the sixty bullets that entered her body. The other woman was seven months pregnant.

Really, doesn't reek of hyperbole to you?

The fact that horrible shit happened isn't in question and neither is the fact that people are now trying to exacerbate the facts to make money.

It's flat out disrespect for the victims and it still ain't lynching.

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#15 2017-05-10 20:13:48

Smudge wrote:

Emmeran said: "Secondly I'm obliged to accept his explanation at face value.  Before the recent rise of "Lynching = Black racism" lynching was used in many contexts and the hangman's noose was something almost every male teenager made at least once in his progression through maturity and acceptance of death as a fact.  His explanation of the use in a salsa commercial (which I recall vividly) is very weak but cannot be discounted unless disproved.  Lynching is also part of most cowboy stories (Texas) from Louis L'Amour to Clint Eastwood in Hang'em High almost all without racial implications.

Basically you are lynching him because the people involved were of a certain race.  So who is the lynch mob now?"

Huh?

Firstly:  Beer causes somewhat disjointed logic in posts.

Secondly:  Basically this individual claimed he was referencing a salsa commercial.



Weak excuse but we are obliged to accept it (with a strong helping of salt).

Thirdly:  Hangman's nooses are typical young male behavior - it happens everywhere because of what the hangman's noose truly represents (not the black thing). And it's a pretty good bet that a lynch mob never went with anything beyond a slip knot.   I struggle to believe that you don't already understand this.

Fourthly:  I would never allow this individual to sit in Lawful Judgement of another person again, lawful judgment is a very serious thing and no amount of untowards behavior should ever be associated with it. In the case of Judges I would state that any use of social media would be considered inappropriate for that chosen life role.

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#16 2017-05-11 08:08:14

Emmeran wrote:

Firstly:  Beer causes somewhat disjointed logic in posts.

Well, let me cut you some slack then.

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#17 2017-05-11 10:48:43

Smudge wrote:

Emmeran wrote:

Firstly:  Beer causes somewhat disjointed logic in posts.

Well, let me cut you some slack then.

Yeah I did kinda go in multiple directions.  My outrage over this person retaining his seat on the bench being the primary driver.

But I am also strongly against the re-writing of history to support any certain groups political agenda.

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#18 2017-05-11 11:50:35

Not a problem.

Just to be abundantly clear, I was not upset with you at any point in this discussion.

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#19 2017-05-11 12:06:40

Smudge wrote:

Not a problem.

Just to be abundantly clear, I was not upset with you at any point in this discussion.

Insults around here are mostly out of fun and respect.  I'm also known to be slightly autistic about certain topics, all in good fun.

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