#2 2017-04-21 13:27:19

10 Episodes appears to be the way to go now.  You're essentially making three full length movies in about four months.  10 Episodes series are the new Indie Films.  And everybody will try to reproduce them with crap shows, never understanding that it's the stories that compel us to watch, and these too will go the way of Mini Series and Indie Films.

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#3 2017-04-21 14:03:54

The last "season" sucked so bad it was almost like being assaulted.

I generally look down my nose at fanboys who whine about this or that remake/re-imagining "ruining their childhood," but by damn the last X-Files revival was one stinking pile. 

I'll reserve judgment but I certainly won't be waiting on my couch the night it airs.

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#4 2017-04-21 14:15:11

George Orr wrote:

The last "season" sucked so bad it was almost like being assaulted.

I generally look down my nose at fanboys who whine about this or that remake/re-imagining "ruining their childhood," but by damn the last X-Files revival was one stinking pile. 

I'll reserve judgment but I certainly won't be waiting on my couch the night it airs.

I concur. I tried, but couldn't make it through an episode.

I think the director must have said to the (largely talented) actors, "Whatever you do, don't act. Just say your lines deadpan, without any expression whatsoever."

I also went back and tried to re-watch a couple of seasons of the original series; it wasn't as good as I remember, and I didn't last with it very long; two episodes, I think. Some things actually have gotten better over time. Not most; but a few have. Television is one of them.

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#5 2017-04-25 11:34:11

Horse hooey grift as science...

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/25/book … obsen.html

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George is right. The last X-file production sucked donkey dick.

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#6 2017-04-25 13:20:38

Interesting article, choad. Allow me to bounce off of it. I tend to be a skeptic, and an aggressive debunker of bullshitters in many of their guises, so, in general, I'm inclined to the author's perspective. But here's the thing; telepathy is quite real, and I know because I have experienced it, not just once or twice, but repeatedly - on an almost daily basis. In fact, I'm quite sure most if not all of us have.

But it's very subtle.

And we are in denial about it culturally, so we have learned to ignore it, or rename it. The most common explanation is "intuition" as though by naming it we have in anyway explained it. It's also not spread evenly amongst people; some people are vastly more sensitive to being able to read others, and some people "broadcast" more powerfully than others (if fact, I think this is the essence of charisma). In other words...while I believe we all do it to some degree, the capacity is not uniform across the population. So when some people tell you in no uncertain terms that this isn't possible, and doesn't happen, they may be describing their own reality with perfect clarity.

There are lots of things which we experience and can't explain, and rather than keep them out in the open where we can remember them and search for explanations, we usually do the exact opposite -- we make ourselves forget them, and hide them away so we forget. Here's a common one; you walk into a party and are doing your first glance around the room, and your eyes lock with a woman's across the room, and you instantly know that you are going to be with her, and probably marry her. She, of course, felt something similar, but you only discussed this years later after the birth of the second child. What's going on here? This is a reasonably common occurrence, but one which we not only can't explain, but don't bother to spend time mulling over. We make jokes about "love at first sight", but we, remarkably, simply refuse to ask questions about the implications of the processes involved themselves. Odd, eh?

Or another examples of...our thoughts connecting...which I experience almost anytime I go to the store. I'm a voyeur; I love to look at women, and I love a nice ass. When I'm at the store I have to be very careful, and very conscious of where my eyes are drifting or they will, quite naturally focus on a handsome posterior. But if I linger too long, or allow myself to enjoy the view too freely, I'm invariably met with one of two responses. The woman either reaches back and covers her butt with her hand, or whatever else she has available, or she will turn and look at me and confront me for taking liberties.

So it begs the question; how did they know I was looking?

When I was younger I had eagle eyes. I could read road signs at half a mile off. I was in one of Portland's large parks, and I spotted a sexy woman walking. She was perhaps an eighth of a mile away, but it was a bright sunny day, and there was nothing between her and me, and even at that distance I could see that she had a beautiful ass. She was power walking away from me, probably doing her daily exercise. But she stopped, turned around and looked directly into my eyes with a look that made her feelings very clear -- stop looking at my ass, jack. The park was full of people. How did she know she was being studied, by someone so far away, and lastly, how did she know it was me doing it?

My ex-wife and I would reach for the phone to call each other, only to interrupt the other in the process of dialing. When I called her the line would be busy. When I finally connected a few seconds later, I asked who she was on the phone with and she'd inform me she was in the process of calling me. Or the exact reverse. This would happen on average once a week or so. One time I picked the phone up to call her, and I got no dial tone because she was on the line already. I had picked up the phone before it rang.

This stuff runs strong in my family. My mom would have, at other times, been considered a witch. I actually still do consider her to be one; she's creepy powerful at reading people. My brothers and I all lean powerfully toward intuitive perception, in spite of also having well developed capacities for reasoning. But of the two, intuition is the more powerful in my experience; knowing is even better than reasoning. I started out as skeptical as anyone about this stuff, but I've simply had far too many examples of things which can't be explained by the standard paradigm.

I think a lot of people have noticed these kinds of experiences, but they keep their thoughts to themselves. It's as though we have all agreed to not notice this kind of phenomenon. I brought this subject up on another forum once, just to see what kinds of responses I would get. Not one person said anything in response. So I would not be surprised if that's what happens here as well.

But, if so, that too would be odd, eh? Negative information is often as revealing as positive information.

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#7 2017-04-25 15:18:40

Surprise!

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#8 2017-04-25 15:20:34

LOL...

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#9 2017-04-25 16:03:15

Well, don't be like that, so many here are just old, jaded and too lazy to respond. Still I will arise from my stupor and feed your confirmation bias. Plus I just love the tales of personal experiences. Stuff happens repeatedly over time to me, but I have no way of knowing if it is beyond the 14 or so senses that we have.

I have spent time with folks studying perception and clearly the mind works in interesting ways.  Still it was with other researchers studying animal behavior where I really got to see how so finely tuned perception can become. Particularly around  of the parts of the world that are key to thriving or just survival. It can seem like you can increase intuition just by paying close attention. Or maybe one does actually tune in more intuitively. Nature is a great teacher.

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#10 2017-04-25 16:15:20

Smudge wrote:

So it begs the question; how did they know I was looking?

To quote Lorne Malvo from the first season of Fargo, "The human eye can see more shades of green than any other color.  When you figure out why, you'll have the answer to your question."

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#11 2017-04-26 01:07:34

Too bad the Randi prize has been discontinued - your uncanny ability to creep women out at long distances could have made you a cool million.

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#12 2017-04-26 01:24:59

LOL. I admit, creeping women out is a talent I seem to possess in abundance.

I have lots of other examples of similar phenomenon in my life, but I intentionally chose the most pedestrian and mundane.

I appreciate the various responses. I think the crowd that hangs out here includes a lot of very bright and interesting people. I'm glad I stumbled in.

http://68.media.tumblr.com/58e5fdd1d287b44fe002eec6b1bcfd8c/tumblr_op00diRIyQ1qz6f9yo1_640.jpg

Last edited by Smudge (2017-04-26 04:09:57)

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#13 2017-04-26 09:34:46

I'm with Smudge on this, I think the ability to know when someone is focusing on us is a talent that was probably developed over the last million years to help us survive against commonly warlike other hominids. You can feel your Spidey Sense tingling even when the person is behind you in a crowd. Some people say that you see 99% of these things on an autonomic level and it never makes it past your brain stem, discarded as random noise. At least until you see the reflection of eyes or a perfectly round sclera indicating that the person is looking straight at you, then the signal is bubbled up into your conscious brain.

As both a scientist/engineer and a skeptic I like to believe that there are forces at work in the universe that we have not (yet) been able to build machines to measure. Maybe it's like pheromones, something that you can't really consciously sense but yet are received and processed by your body. (To what end, nobody really agrees...)

And I can totally get why the government would want to research and test these kinds of things. It's a cost/benefit play. On a governmental scale, they spend more money on paper clips, and like a lot of DARPA projects, will probably net nothing of use. But they get value by eliminating the doubt that it "might" work and taking a wild chance on a small percentage of winning a big jackpot is not reserved for Las Vegas. It's the basis for most medical research too.

From a tinfoil hat standpoint, paranormal/UFO/telepathy research also has the nice side effect of pinpointing the crackpots for easy monitoring. It's easier to draw them out of their dark crevices than to go hunting for them...

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#14 2017-04-26 13:39:48

GooberMcNutly wrote:

...I think the ability to know when someone is focusing on us is a talent that was probably developed over the last million years to help us survive against commonly warlike other hominids. You can feel your Spidey Sense tingling even when the person is behind you in a crowd. Some people say that you see 99% of these things on an autonomic level and it never makes it past your brain stem, discarded as random noise. At least until you see the reflection of eyes or a perfectly round sclera indicating that the person is looking straight at you, then the signal is bubbled up into your conscious brain.

As both a scientist/engineer and a skeptic I like to believe that there are forces at work in the universe that we have not (yet) been able to build machines to measure. Maybe it's like pheromones, something that you can't really consciously sense but yet are received and processed by your body. (To what end, nobody really agrees...)




I wrote an extensive response to this, but lost it when I went to post it; I'm using a VPN, and I think it's conflicting with something at High-Street. This has not happened to me before here, but I'm frustrated at having written for 45 minutes only to lose the product in its entirety. Note to self: grab a copy of the text BEFORE you hit [Submit].

---

This is very similar to the way I view it, Goober. And I don't see the process as being in anyway super-natural; simply one of the more subtle natural adaptions which we use, and to some extent rely on, without understanding how the underlying processes work. Do you suppose that the animals that use the earth's magnetic field to navigate understand that they are doing so? I suspect that they simply trust in the fact that they 'know' where they are going. For me, that's how intuition, hunch and this subtle connectedness works; I have learned, after years of experience living, that my hunches, intuitions and "knowing" are at least as reliable for getting at the truth of things, and often far more accurate, than thoughts, which can lead you down a thousand blind alleys.

There's a conundrum about awareness which I've been forced to confront many times; that which you aren't aware of, you aren't aware of. For the person who isn't aware of something, that thing doesn't exist. We have been taught that telepathy doesn't, and can't exist (return to the top article; note the absolute authority with which the author dismisses the possibility, and lumps it together with various nonsense phenomenon). My view is that this is the primary reason we can't see the obvious. We have been taught not to see it. In fact, the evidence is all around us. Once again; if you open your mind, you will begin to notice things.

Here's another one; I began to become aware that I could frequently anticipate someone on the freeway pulling out of the lane ahead of me, and sliding over into the passing lane moments before they begin to make the shift. Several times this allowed me to avert a crash, as I was about to commit myself to passing, but hesitated. Or...I had a hunch that someone had moved into my blind spot even though I had not seen them do so. When I look, it confirms. Indeed, in traffic, we all act (with occasional exceptions) as though we had some degree of hive mind. It's actually rather staggering to contemplate the fact that we propel ourselves down the freeway at fatal speeds, merely feet apart from, and being completely surrounded by other cars doing the same thing, and yet we rarely crash. This is a remarkable accomplishment, yet we view is as ordinary and even mundane.

I think when we drive, we learn how to 'get on the same wavelength' as the other drivers, and more of our 'intuitive functions' take over.

For me, the fact that I have an abundance of experience with this kind of thing means that the instructions to "not see" are inadequate to repress my perceptions. I know from experience, and from talking with others, and from reading, that I'm far from alone in my awareness of this kind of thing. There are lots of us; the most common thread between us being that we have learned to keep these perceptions to ourselves. What I don't know if this group represents one out of ten people, one out of a hundred or one out of a thousand. My hunch is it's closest to one out of ten, but I'm not certain.I guess my experiment here was to see if anyone else was going to be ready to say "Yeah, I experience this too -- all of the time."

For those who are not aware, this neither exists, nor can it exist. For those who are open minded...well...I've pointed at directions to pay attention to. For me, not only does this exist, its absolutely inescapable, and frankly, the marvel is that it can hide in plain sight as people maneuver around the obvious. For many of these phenomenon, there simply are no other adequate explanations; we are connected to each other in ways which we not only don't understand, but where we actively repress seeing the evidence.

Even more remarkable than our ability to see is our ability to not see that which we have decided to ignore. There actually IS an elephant in the living room, and its ruining the couch, and scuffing up the floor. Trust me on this; I can see it pretty clearly.

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#15 2017-04-26 14:42:02

It sounds more like you are describing a combination of inherent mastery (not needing to think about the reaction to something before executing that action) and selection bias. We can all drive on the freeway or walk in a crowd without bumping in to each other because we are experts at that kind of thing. We remember when we stared at someone and they turned around (because it shocked both of us at an animalistic flight-or-fight level) and we don't remember when we stared and they didn't. But, like yourself, I'm not sure that's 100% of the answer. What confounds the experiment is that it's probably 95% of the answer, and any scientific phenomenon is difficult to measure if you can't account for noise in the data.

Maybe make a personal experiment. Go to the park or other public place. Pick any person more than 20 and less than 100 feet away that isn't actively involved in something complicated and isn't looking at you. (It's OK to pre-select for tig-ass-bitties or a batchin' ass, I won't tell). Focus intently on them for 60 seconds. Record the percentage of times they turn and look at you within that minute. Try to get 20-100 data points. Try not to get arrested. Let us know what you discover.

I think feeling this kind of effect is more like the tasting the flavor of cilantro. I can't taste it at all, or maybe a slight sour soapy flavor. My wife loves it and says it adds great flavor to everything. Diacetyl (fake buttered popcorn flavor) is 90% invisible to me as well. My palate doesn't lack in any other way (I'm also a nationally ranked beer judge with the BJCP) but cilantro and diacetyl is invisible to me. Yet other people swear up and down that they exist and are strong flavors. But without consensus, I would never even know of them. I think that's how most people are, either insensitive or unrecognizing.

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