#76 2017-09-01 12:24:51

GooberMcNutly wrote:

My Dad lived in Gulf Port MS for a while and tanker cars would roll by 2 blocks from his house all day long. So he started looking up the placard numbers. A year later he moved. He told me that once per day he would see a train that, if derailed, would probably kill every living organism within a 1/2 mile and half of them within 2 miles. If it crashed on one of the innumerable bridges it would probably kill the shellfish industry within 20 miles. All chained together on a train, oxidizers coupled right to hydrocarbon tanks in a rolling version of a diesel fertilizer bomb, except in 10 ton loads.

Pretty much everything hazardous travels by rail.  I wouldn't live near a rail yard by choice, what can be near each other switching or just sitting there is far more lax than what can be near each other in a train.  Manager's bonus money trumps all when deciding if something is legal or not.

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#77 2017-09-01 13:06:44

hedgewizard wrote:

GooberMcNutly wrote:

My Dad lived in Gulf Port MS for a while and tanker cars would roll by 2 blocks from his house all day long. So he started looking up the placard numbers. A year later he moved. He told me that once per day he would see a train that, if derailed, would probably kill every living organism within a 1/2 mile and half of them within 2 miles. If it crashed on one of the innumerable bridges it would probably kill the shellfish industry within 20 miles. All chained together on a train, oxidizers coupled right to hydrocarbon tanks in a rolling version of a diesel fertilizer bomb, except in 10 ton loads.

Pretty much everything hazardous travels by rail.  I wouldn't live near a rail yard by choice, what can be near each other switching or just sitting there is far more lax than what can be near each other in a train.  Manager's bonus money trumps all when deciding if something is legal or not.

I did a project for Sealand/Maersk where I wrote a process that would go through a ship's cargo manifest for hazardous materials (and on a ship, even a bale of cotton is deemed a hazardous material) and compare that to what a port would allow 1) to leave its docks, 2) to sit on its docks or 3) even allowed in the port at all.  Many, especially in other countries, were very tight-assed.  New Orleans, however, lived up to its Big Easy title.  Nothing was banned; even nuclear material was allowed in.

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#78 2017-09-02 03:22:49

Baywolfe wrote:

I did a project for Sealand/Maersk where I wrote a process that would go through a ship's cargo manifest for hazardous materials (and on a ship, even a bale of cotton is deemed a hazardous material) and compare that to what a port would allow 1) to leave its docks, 2) to sit on its docks or 3) even allowed in the port at all.  Many, especially in other countries, were very tight-assed.  New Orleans, however, lived up to its Big Easy title.  Nothing was banned; even nuclear material was allowed in.

I remember a DOD shipment where the paperwork said you have something hazardous in this car and it could be any of these things (a laundry list of every chemical, nuclear, and biological nasty you don't want to be near).  Well which one is it?  We're not telling you, just run the damn train and shut up.  Rules are meant to be broken when it's convenient/profitable.

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#79 2017-09-02 13:45:37

hedgewizard wrote:

Baywolfe wrote:

I did a project for Sealand/Maersk where I wrote a process that would go through a ship's cargo manifest for hazardous materials (and on a ship, even a bale of cotton is deemed a hazardous material) and compare that to what a port would allow 1) to leave its docks, 2) to sit on its docks or 3) even allowed in the port at all.  Many, especially in other countries, were very tight-assed.  New Orleans, however, lived up to its Big Easy title.  Nothing was banned; even nuclear material was allowed in.

I remember a DOD shipment where the paperwork said you have something hazardous in this car and it could be any of these things (a laundry list of every chemical, nuclear, and biological nasty you don't want to be near).  Well which one is it?  We're not telling you, just run the damn train and shut up.  Rules are meant to be broken when it's convenient/profitable.

Yes, absolutely!  In fact, another function of the process I wrote was to disallow the shipment if any hard-rejects came back.  It wasn't in production one day before they asked me to add an override to allow the shipment anyway.

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#80 2017-09-03 12:56:25

This is San Antonio's only grocery store chain--other than Wal-Mart and little mom & pop bodegas, they have a monopoly here.  And yet, the quality of their merch, their prices, and their impeccable reputation as a good employer means that even if competitors' stores were available, I'd still shop there.
This is an interview with the guy who runs the stores in SE Texas.  I'm very impressed.

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#81 2017-09-03 13:08:34

Very impressive stuff. And that's how you build absolute customer loyalty too.

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#82 2017-12-11 20:47:06

I am officially living deep in the arse of Texas now.  If you want to find me I'll be in the piney forests of deep East Texas.

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#83 2017-12-12 11:54:56

Dirckman wrote:

I am officially living deep in the arse of Texas now.  If you want to find me I'll be in the piney forests of deep East Texas.

A very nice area.  I, myself, have wandered through the Piney Woods a time or two.

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#84 2018-01-13 07:22:21

https://high-street.org/sidepic/womendrivers.png


~ click ~

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#85 2018-01-15 09:27:56

Volunteer fundraisers for the city? What could go wrong?

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#86 2018-02-24 20:02:31

Deep East Texas was too racist and backwoods for us so we moved to The Woodlands....   I like it.

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#87 2018-02-25 20:30:38

Dirckman wrote:

Deep East Texas was too racist and backwoods for us so we moved to The Woodlands....   I like it.

When I moved to Houston in 1980, well Spring really, the Woodlands was where the wealthiest of the nouveau riche lived.  The old money actually still live in Houston.  It was also the first area to become deserted after the oil bust of the 1980s.  Now it's just a really nice suburban city.

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#89 2018-02-26 10:52:23

That projection was made Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, as Harvey barreled toward Houston. The next day's Army Corps forecast was even more worrisome: Both Barker and Addicks reservoirs would spill beyond government-owned land, engulfing nearby homes and businesses.

The Corps did not share these predictions with the public.

It wasn't until Saturday, Aug. 26, that authorities in Fort Bend County - after being briefed on the latest Army Corps forecast - issued the first flooding advisory for neighborhoods adjacent to Barker.

So the Corps projected the event on Thurday, briefed the County in the next 24~48hrs and the County announced the advisory on Saturday.  That doesn't sound like they hid anything to me, that sounds like a designed process.

It also sounds like idiots built/bought houses on a flood plain and now want the tax payers to foot the bill.

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#90 2018-02-26 11:17:03

Emmeran wrote:

It also sounds like idiots built/bought houses on a flood plain and now want the tax payers to foot the bill.

Also see: Florida coastline.

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#91 2018-02-26 12:00:04

GooberMcNutly wrote:

Emmeran wrote:

It also sounds like idiots built/bought houses on a flood plain and now want the tax payers to foot the bill.

Also see: Florida coastline.

See also out my front window. The pine paneling my walls arrived dirt cheap after the last big blow flattened most of our trees.

http://high-street.org/img/1938.Hurricane_Onset.MA.jpg


Note, this particular village across town was settled by Spiritualists, fundi fruitcakes who believed they could commune with the dead.

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#92 2018-02-26 15:23:47

..those cars look rather vintage....when was that pic taken?...1930's..?

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#93 2018-02-26 15:31:33

Mugwump wrote:

..those cars look rather vintage....when was that pic taken?...1930's..?

1938.

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#95 2018-06-20 15:11:00

LOL.  Vega, Texas.  Way up in the panhandle outside of Amarillo where only the prairie dogs and mental defectives live. I'm sure he got a real good deal on the rental price.

Since I-40 runs East/West and Texas is between New Mexico and Oklahoma, I'm not sure where he thinks those liberals are coming from.

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#97 2018-06-30 16:56:09

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