#52 2017-05-01 00:02:27

http://high-street.org/sidepic/wickedwitchofthewest.png


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#53 2017-05-01 10:17:25

Welcome to spring in East Texas.  It's all that frigid air that keeps coming down from the great white north colliding with our warm southern air.  More people freeze to death every year than are killed by tornadoes.

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#55 2017-08-25 19:15:20

San Antonio is currently bracing for an influx of coastal refugees.
How much coverage is Harvey getting outside of TX?  And how hysterical is it?  I've spent the last two days reassuring NC family that no, we're not being evacuated and no, we're not going to drown.

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#56 2017-08-25 22:05:05

George Orr wrote:

San Antonio is currently bracing for an influx of coastal refugees.
How much coverage is Harvey getting outside of TX?  And how hysterical is it?  I've spent the last two days reassuring NC family that no, we're not being evacuated and no, we're not going to drown.

LOL.  Yeah, we're getting the same thing in Dallas from Minnesota in-laws.  "Are you near the storm?"  "Well, yes, about 300 miles.  That's near in Texas terms."

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#58 2017-08-29 20:46:41

I'm still waiting for Alex Jones to deny existence of the flooding.

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#59 2017-08-29 20:56:36

Baywolfe wrote:

Dirckman wrote:

Baywolfe wrote:


Because an apartment the size of a discarded refrigerator box costs $3000 a month.  You want to buy a home?  Hope you can afford a starting range of $750,000 to $3,000,000.

I'm impressed with the cost of houses in the Houston area.  I can almost buy two houses for what my house in Colorado is worth.  I keep thinking there must be something wrong with the neighborhoods, but housing is just inexpensive here even in desirable neighborhoods.

Most of the suburbs are nice.  We lived in Katy for a while.  It used to be that the closer to downtown you were, the more expensive the houses.  My oldest son and his family live in Tomball, it's really cheap out there.  What areas are you looking in?

I've been looking in Spring, The Woodlands, Kingwood and Katy areas.

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#60 2017-08-30 11:05:46

Dirckman wrote:

Baywolfe wrote:

Dirckman wrote:


I'm impressed with the cost of houses in the Houston area.  I can almost buy two houses for what my house in Colorado is worth.  I keep thinking there must be something wrong with the neighborhoods, but housing is just inexpensive here even in desirable neighborhoods.

Most of the suburbs are nice.  We lived in Katy for a while.  It used to be that the closer to downtown you were, the more expensive the houses.  My oldest son and his family live in Tomball, it's really cheap out there.  What areas are you looking in?

I've been looking in Spring, The Woodlands, Kingwood and Katy areas.

All nice areas.  At least they were...

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#61 2017-08-30 11:55:06

Baywolfe wrote:

Dirckman wrote:

Baywolfe wrote:


Most of the suburbs are nice.  We lived in Katy for a while.  It used to be that the closer to downtown you were, the more expensive the houses.  My oldest son and his family live in Tomball, it's really cheap out there.  What areas are you looking in?

I've been looking in Spring, The Woodlands, Kingwood and Katy areas.

All nice areas.  At least they were...

The whole thing is a flood plain, who the fuck is stupid enough to build on a flood plain?  Idjits.

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#62 2017-08-30 13:31:37

Emmeran wrote:

Baywolfe wrote:

Dirckman wrote:


I've been looking in Spring, The Woodlands, Kingwood and Katy areas.

All nice areas.  At least they were...

The whole thing is a flood plain, who the fuck is stupid enough to build on a flood plain?  Idjits.

Seriously. Doesn't *every* blues song involve a levy breaking? It shouldn't be a surprise when they do.

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#63 2017-08-30 16:43:26

Emmeran wrote:

Baywolfe wrote:

Dirckman wrote:


I've been looking in Spring, The Woodlands, Kingwood and Katy areas.

All nice areas.  At least they were...

The whole thing is a flood plain, who the fuck is stupid enough to build on a flood plain?  Idjits.

Houston in built on a swamp.  The San Jacinto monument is slowly sinking into the ground.  To the north in Spring or west in Katy is much higher and more solid ground.

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#64 2017-08-30 16:44:01

GooberMcNutly wrote:

Emmeran wrote:

Baywolfe wrote:


All nice areas.  At least they were...

The whole thing is a flood plain, who the fuck is stupid enough to build on a flood plain?  Idjits.

Seriously. Doesn't *every* blues song involve a levy breaking? It shouldn't be a surprise when they do.

I just remember the Led Zeppelin song.

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#65 2017-08-30 20:41:59

I'm looking for opportunity with this hurricane.  After Katrina real estate prices dropped to rock bottom and recovered 99% within three years.  I'm hoping to find cheap real estate that will appreciate quickly.

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#66 2017-08-31 07:04:31

Baywolfe wrote:

Houston in built on a swamp.  The San Jacinto monument is slowly sinking into the ground.  To the north in Spring or west in Katy is much higher and more solid ground.

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#67 2017-08-31 15:12:12

AladdinSane wrote:

I'm still waiting for Alex Jones to deny existence of the flooding.

I asked.

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#68 2017-08-31 16:24:08

AladdinSane wrote:

AladdinSane wrote:

I'm still waiting for Alex Jones to deny existence of the flooding.

I asked.

You win.

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#70 2017-09-01 00:20:25

https://high-street.org/sidepic/catflood.pnghttps://high-street.org/sidepic/katrina.pnghttps://high-street.org/sidepic/houseboats.jpg

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#71 2017-09-01 04:53:37

Here comes the long Second Line of thieving shitweasles...

http://www.chron.com/business/columnist … 164662.php

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#72 2017-09-01 08:59:30

When I first moved to Houston I was told that 27 different dangerous chemicals are released into the air and water every day.  The company where I met my wife was next door to an ammonia plant.  Yeah, no danger of that ever having dire consequences.

Texas was once a vast, majestic, prairie that has come to be filled with some of the worst fucking people in the world.

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#73 2017-09-01 09:18:44

My Dad lived in Gulf Port MS for a while and tanker cars would roll by 2 blocks from his house all day long. So he started looking up the placard numbers. A year later he moved. He told me that once per day he would see a train that, if derailed, would probably kill every living organism within a 1/2 mile and half of them within 2 miles. If it crashed on one of the innumerable bridges it would probably kill the shellfish industry within 20 miles. All chained together on a train, oxidizers coupled right to hydrocarbon tanks in a rolling version of a diesel fertilizer bomb, except in 10 ton loads.

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#74 2017-09-01 09:30:05

Deregulation is simply one more tool to privatize the profits while socializing the expenses of disaster mitigation. Us mere humans always pay the costs -- in terms of lives and dollars both -- of cleaning up the messes which deregulation makes inevitable.

Remember, the ultimate purpose of evolution is to create a few rich people, and then to make them even richer over time.

PS -- Everybody should have a Hazardous Materials Guide handy so they can read those placards on train cars, and the sides of trucks.

Last edited by Smudge (2017-09-01 09:31:38)

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#75 2017-09-01 12:20:51

Smudge wrote:

Deregulation is simply one more tool to privatize the profits while socializing the expenses of disaster mitigation. Us mere humans always pay the costs -- in terms of lives and dollars both -- of cleaning up the messes which deregulation makes inevitable.

Remember, the ultimate purpose of evolution is to create a few rich people, and then to make them even richer over time.

PS -- Everybody should have a Hazardous Materials Guide handy so they can read those placards on train cars, and the sides of trucks.

https://www.phmsa.dot.gov/staticfiles/P … RG2016.pdf

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