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#1127 2017-05-02 05:16:36

Obeying the law is hard - let's go shopping in Congress for a free pass.

Amid an unexpected fight over US surveillance powers from congressional Republicans, the National Security Agency has agreed to curb its highly controversial collection of Americans' emails that discuss foreign intelligence targets, although how comprehensive that stoppage is remains unclear. . . .

It is far from the first time the NSA has conceded that its vast surveillance powers under section 702, a surveillance authority expiring in December, have surpassed the boundaries set with the Fisa [Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act] court.

A Fisa court decision from 2011, declassified in 2013, found that the agency had overcollected tens of thousands of purely domestic US emails in violation of the law, which permits warrantless interception of Americans' international communications so long as one party to the communication is a foreigner overseas.

The NSA at the time represented the 702 overcollection as an unavoidable consequence of its collection technology - a limit it cited on Friday to warn that the agency could not fully purge its hoards of data that it now pledges no longer to collect.

"Because of the limits of its current technology, [NSA] is unable to completely eliminate `about' communications from its upstream 702 collection without also excluding some of the relevant communications directly `to or from' its foreign intelligence targets. That limitation remains even today," it said.

Yet the NSA's authorities under executive order 12333 are vast, undisclosed and unconstrained by any need to explain its collections to the Fisa court. A former state department official who has warned Congress about 12333, John Napier Tye, has alleged that the NSA uses 12333 as a backup plan to route around legal restrictions on US surveillance.

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#1128 2017-05-02 12:26:28

square wrote:

Obeying the law is hard - let's go shopping in Congress for a free pass.

The NSA at the time represented the 702 overcollection as an unavoidable consequence of its collection technology - a limit it cited on Friday to warn that the agency could not fully purge its hoards of data that it now pledges no longer to collect.

"Sorry, we can't help but collect that information". They can detect when they have collected it and can tell you why they "miscollected" it, but can't do anything about it after the fact?

I just can't wait until another Snowden-type leaks how the system collected information about an elected representative and shows all of the dirty laundry. *Then* it will get "held accountable"...

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#1129 2017-05-04 00:09:41

Collect it all is alive and well.

A report issued by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) yesterday provides a sobering set of statistics on the breadth and depth of US intelligence surveillance of targets both overseas and within the United States. Even after steps were taken to reduce the collection of phone call metadata--ending bulk collection of phone company records and limiting collection to specific requests against records held by telecommunications providers--the National Security Agency collected over 151 million phone call records while tracking only 42 targets.

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#1130 2017-05-04 15:00:26

square wrote:

Collect it all is alive and well.

...the National Security Agency collected over 151 million phone call records while tracking only 42 targets.

That's just the 42 suspects' "social network". List them as People of Interest. Pertinent to the Investigation. Boom, done!

Soon the crime will be to have once liked someone who has just been declared an Agent of the Eurasia empire!

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#1131 2017-05-04 21:37:36

GooberMcNutly wrote:

square wrote:

Collect it all is alive and well.

...the National Security Agency collected over 151 million phone call records while tracking only 42 targets.

That's just the 42 suspects' "social network". List them as People of Interest. Pertinent to the Investigation. Boom, done!

Soon the crime will be to have once liked someone who has just been declared an Agent of the Eurasia empire!

Nonsense, we're fighting Eastasia, we've always been fighting Eastasia.

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#1133 2017-05-05 13:50:23

I just keep getting sicker and sicker. It feels like the world is running away from me. It's like the darkness coming out of Mordor in Lord Of the Rings; it's taking over.

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#1134 2017-05-06 10:46:29

I don't think the world is any worse than it's always been and, thanks to science, in many ways better.  Of course the Democracies all over the world are failing, we've all become absentee landlords and the fools now run our countries because we let even bigger fools elect them. 

I want to live just long enough to see the GOP regret allowing practically everybody in America to buy as many guns as they want.  Because, some day, they're coming for the rich people.

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#1135 2017-05-06 12:18:12

Baywolfe wrote:

I want to live just long enough to see the GOP regret allowing practically everybody in America to buy as many guns as they want.  Because, some day, they're coming for the rich people.

(Nodding my head...)

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#1137 2017-05-08 22:18:50

This made quite a boom while landing. Any guesses what the USAF is doing with a returnable payload in space for 2 year stretches?

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#1138 2017-05-09 09:22:20

GooberMcNutly wrote:

This made quite a boom while landing. Any guesses what the USAF is doing with a returnable payload in space for 2 year stretches?

Dunno, spying I'm sure. 

More importantly, the event really straddles this and the Robogeddon topics since this vehicle was, essentially, a robot.

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#1139 2017-05-20 21:23:59

As many of you already know, Verizon is flushing its email service - for cost reasons, they say - and telling subscribers they can keep their existing addresses by migrating to Verizon's newly acquired AOL unit... where rest assured they'll scan the living shit out of your mail and flog it to highest bidder.

Brave new world, huh?

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#1140 2017-05-21 11:32:41

choad wrote:

As many of you already know, Verizon is flushing its email service - for cost reasons, they say - and telling subscribers they can keep their existing addresses by migrating to Verizon's newly acquired AOL unit... where rest assured they'll scan the living shit out of your mail and flog it to highest bidder.

Brave new world, huh?

I have remained a Luddite in certain aspects; one of those is that I have not transferred my life to my smartphone (although I do, of course, own one).
I use FB Messenger on the phone for spur-of-the-moment comm with my spouse (e.g., "The store is out of your favorite pickled herring, so what is your second choice?") and it's been useful when traveling. 
I do not surf the Web on my smartphone.
I check the time and the weather.
And I play games.
I can count the number of actual phone conversations I've had on the smartphone on my fingers and not run out.  If my car ever breaks down or some other emergency, er, emerges, I might run it up past ten.
I do NOT use e-mail on my phone.  Although I had to create a gmail account to access certain of the wonders of my smartphone, it is moribund.  I don't use it and I don't pay attention to the spam that's accumulated there.
There are a lot of things you CAN do with a smartphone.  There's no need to do them all.

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#1141 2017-05-24 16:06:51

George Orr wrote:

choad wrote:

As many of you already know, Verizon is flushing its email service - for cost reasons, they say - and telling subscribers they can keep their existing addresses by migrating to Verizon's newly acquired AOL unit... where rest assured they'll scan the living shit out of your mail and flog it to highest bidder.

I have remained a Luddite in certain aspects; one of those is that I have not transferred my life to my smartphone (although I do, of course, own one).

My current handset was made by Western Electric in Sept 1975. Replacement parts, never a problem. I tried a cell phone about 6 months and gave up in disgust. I am pathologically cheap. It was our only shared creed in this town. I acquired my first food processor and trash picked microwave within the last ten years. One man's rubbish...

http://high-street.org/sidepic/animalfarm.png


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#1142 Yesterday 00:24:26

The guy might have had good motivations, but don't nobody want to see that.

An Oregon man who stripped naked at an airport security screening checkpoint must pay a $500 fine after a federal appeals court ruled that the First Amendment does not protect this method of protest.

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#1143 Yesterday 00:26:49

Obama's war on whistleblowers continues apace.

Under intense pressure from the White House, the Justice Department is prepared to aggressively prosecute government officials who leak classified information. Justice Department officials told The Daily Beast that targeting leakers will be a priority during Jeff Sessions' time as attorney general--a posture that will hearten national security hawks, while concerning advocates of whistleblower protections.

Of course, the primary deciding factor is whose political side you're on.

"The fact that the president shared classified information with a foreign government official, in and of itself, is classified," a former senior intelligence official told The Daily Beast. "So whoever was trying to burn him for thinking he's doing something wrong actually is the only one that committed a crime here."

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#1144 Yesterday 00:28:10

Small steps, man, small steps.

The Wikimedia Foundation has won another day in court challenging the National Security Agency over the government's so-called "Upstream" surveillance program that was disclosed by Edward Snowden.

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