#26 2018-02-10 15:10:46

I've been making yeasted breads (pizza, focaccia, rolls, breads) for a couple of years now regularly. I've stopped buying store bought bread all together because it's so fast and easy and fun to make my own. Plus...you never really master any recipe (IMHO) until you've made it fifty times, and I'm probably past fifty times now on my basic bread -- so I'm starting to feel pretty confident in my skills. And I can whip out a bread recipe before I've even had my first cup of coffee -- I've done it so many times I don't have to read a recipe. My hands simply remember.

I've never made French bread, but I'm going to give it a try. The thing is...it's the exact same ingredient list as any other bread. The only thing which makes it different than other bread is an exacting control of technique. I've always been intimidated, but I'm feeling confident enough, finally, to give it a try.

As I started my research today, I came across this clip. I've used Julia Child's recipes in the past (I was a chef for many years, and put myself through college doing it, and I used Julia's recipes professionally as well) and I have found her recipes to be about the best out there. So...I'm sure that this is about as good as I going to find in terms of instructional videos. But it's also entertaining as hell, so I'm going to share it. It's worth the watch simply for the segment for where the master French baker (the one who teaches all of the other master bakers how its done) shows how to form the loaf.

Only the French would be so exacting in their bread making that they can actually tell you how many times the dough has been flipped over, or exactly how many razor cuts a loaf has to have -- no more; no less; it must be exactly three!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iH3hjDUhWw

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#27 2018-02-10 17:16:39

Filet Mignon with French Onion soup and hand made Caesar dressing...

http://high-street.org/uploads/11_filet.jpg

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#28 2018-02-10 17:17:33

Smudge,

Not being a baker myself I have gaps in my understanding of what importance ingredients make. Recently I was standing by the grain docks in Portland  where they bring down high grade flour grain from the interior. I was wondering what difference does the grain varieties make for gluten and protein content. And if it is important to seek out regional sources for different flours? What are the sources used in Europe these days, do they get hi protein flour from us?

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#29 2018-02-10 17:44:49

Johnny_Rotten wrote:

Smudge,

Not being a baker myself I have gaps in my understanding of what importance ingredients make. Recently I was standing by the grain docks in Portland  where they bring down high grade flour grain from the interior. I was wondering what difference does the grain varieties make for gluten and protein content. And if it is important to seek out regional sources for different flours? What are the sources used in Europe these days, do they get hi protein flour from us?

(Full disclosure; I've never been much of a baker; so this is new for me and I'm just learning the basics.)

Well...Julia gets into that if you watch the whole clip. She says that in America, basic unbleached flour is the closest thing to French flour. She recommends against using bread flour because it has, in her view, too much gluten. And her recipe shows classic French technique, and so using the ingredients which emulate their French equivalent makes the most sense. But I suspect you can use any of a variety of flours if you stick at it long enough, and learn how to adjust your recipes to the specific ingredients you have available.

My understanding is that pastry flour crumbles better (soft wheat) and so if good for tender crumb, and things like muffins. cake and pie shell, and that bread flour (hard wheat, high gluten) holds gas bubbles for a better rise. Our American all-purpose flour is a combo of the two to split the difference. I've been using unbleached, all purpose flour for years because I hate corporate food ( which is designed to maximize profits and consumer be damned) so I've merely been focusing on finding the least adulterated product. I add at least a little whole wheat flour to all of my baking because white flour is so tasteless, and even a tiny bit of WW gives a bit of a nutty flavor.

I don't worry about the protein content because I get all I need from a steady diet of one eared coyotes.

I wouldn't be surprised if Europe uses American and Canadian flour because we produce so much, so cheaply, but that's just a guess. I know nothing about it.

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#30 2018-02-10 18:41:36

Smudge wrote:

I don't worry about the protein content because I get all I need from a steady diet of one eared coyotes.

Melon's is all into this and I'll have her post an answer to your questions, it's really just a science thing with a touch of talent on top.  Depending on what you want from your bread you will or will not be concerned about the type of flour and the flavor of the yeast.  Milk vs water (and what type of water), sugars, eggs (and the freshness/temp thereof) all come into play.  Hell we spent two years on pancakes, flap-jacks and johny-cakes.  I don't even want to discuss the biscuit period....

It's like beer dude...

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#31 2018-02-11 09:42:41

http://high-street.org/uploads/11_recipefreestyle-frittata.jpg

Click for more freestyle guides

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#33 2018-04-07 10:56:41

Emmeran wrote:

http://high-street.org/uploads/11_recip … ittata.jpg

Click for more freestyle guides

They didn't include the Spanish Tortilla? Potatoes, onions, maybe some jamon serrano and a couple of wild mushrooms?

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#34 2018-05-10 08:16:39

Capon!  It's what's for Mother's Day.

http://high-street.org/uploads/11_capon.jpg
~Click for Amazon pricing~

When the grocery store screws up and refuses to listen to you, you end up with a $70 bird for $8.75; I honestly tried to tell them but the manager wouldn't listen.
Manufacturer link:  https://www.schiltzfoods.com/Minowa_Capons_p/wac.htm

Last edited by Emmeran (2018-05-10 08:17:28)

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#35 2018-05-10 10:14:28

For $70 that chicken better have been personally fucked by Gordon Ramsey.

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#36 2018-05-10 12:57:53

GooberMcNutly wrote:

For $70 that chicken better have been personally fucked by Gordon Ramsey.

Dude this isn't fried factory bird and waffles, this is hand raised Iowa Capon and I got it for less than a ten'r.   Somebody actually took the time to cut this guys testes out of his torso (birds hide their balls inside and only on one side for some reason).  This is true farm-yard bird allowed to range and eat bugs, worms and crap.

Remember - I only paid $8.75 for this magnificent bird and while you fantasize about G.Ramsey fucking factory hens I'll be feasting on top quality and hard to come by fowl.

Away with you and your bitter envy...!!

http://high-street.org/uploads/11_capon-price.jpg

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#37 2018-06-22 14:41:28

Sometimes I sneak over to the other side of the tracks...

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