#351 2017-11-29 21:15:49

Gotta control those young blackfellas!

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#352 2017-11-30 09:02:00

GooberMcNutly wrote:

Gotta control those young blackfellas!

Given the current political climate and culture in America, I'm surprised that shooting looters hasn't become policy here too.  At least at the state level ala Tennessee passing the law making it legal to run over protesters in the road with your car.

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#353 2017-11-30 09:06:56

Baywolfe wrote:

GooberMcNutly wrote:

Gotta control those young blackfellas!

Given the current political climate and culture in America, I'm surprised that shooting looters hasn't become policy here too.  At least at the state level ala Tennessee passing the law making it legal to run over protesters in the road with your car.

It's early days.

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#355 2017-12-04 13:54:14

1) A 17.5% surcharge to pay a parking fine with a credit card?!?
2) You gotta see the attorney's haircut!

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#356 2017-12-07 20:57:02

https://thumbs.gfycat.com/OblongMajesticIncatern-max-1mb.gif

~Do what thou will~

Don't miss this little 1-2 punch:

...the detective assigned to the case, David Abbott, obtained a signed warrant to take photographs of Sims' naked body—including "the suspect’s erect penis"—so that he could compare them to Sims' explicit messages.
...
Abbott committed suicide in December 2015 when officers came to arrest him on separate charges relating to pedophilia.

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#357 2017-12-07 21:00:56



Sorry about the crappy sound.

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#359 2017-12-09 07:52:01

JetRx wrote:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2017/12/08/graphic-video-shows-daniel-shaver-sobbing-and-begging-officer-for-his-life-before-2016-shooting/?utm_term=.4d98d856cfed

Blame the reasonable men for this situation.

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#360 2017-12-10 12:31:11

During the #J20 protests, a small group of demonstrators smashed the windows of Starbucks and Bank of America, spray-painted cars, and overturned several newspaper boxes. Importantly, the prosecution has made no attempt to claim that the defendants were among them. Assistant U.S. Attorney Jennifer Kerkhoff has instead argued that the defendants were “playing a role” in the violence. That’s right: The government is trying to set the precedent that if you’re at a protest and someone else smashes a window, it’s your fault.

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#361 2017-12-15 09:52:26

http://alllies.org/en/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/820020c2d15ab46f114bd93f2722daec.700x469x1.jpg

~click~

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#362 2017-12-19 15:49:28

https://i.imgur.com/SDmSvKA.gif

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#364 2018-01-02 14:16:56

Police deputy chief accused of throwing stress ball at colleague.

I should just put his name and "excessive force" into my news tickler to catch when he finally snaps.

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#366 2018-01-11 21:29:44

Honestly, does anybody think that prison is about reform any more? It's a *penal* institution, not charm school.

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#367 2018-01-11 21:55:46

GooberMcNutly wrote:

Honestly, does anybody think that prison is about reform any more? It's a *penal* institution, not charm school.

Call it what you want, it's a permanent underclass. It's slavery, for misdemeanors to murder.

edit: "It's worse than criminal, it's stoopid." Casey Stengel

Last edited by choad (2018-01-11 22:37:41)

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#369 2018-01-24 11:48:43

Police in the Dutch city of Rotterdam have launched a new pilot programme which will see them confiscating expensive clothing and jewellery from young people if they look too poor to own them.

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#370 2018-01-26 16:30:29

http://www.shootingbums.org/wmr/images/tenderfoot.gif

- Click to dance

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#371 2018-01-26 16:55:28

Stole dat.

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#372 2018-01-30 13:32:43

Couldn't decide if I should put this here or in Smokeless.

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#373 2018-01-30 14:25:18

Ann Arbor cutting down trees to kill deer to save trees

Honestly, I tried to come up with a better lede, but couldn't.

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#374 2018-01-30 15:33:46

GooberMcNutly wrote:

Ann Arbor cutting down trees to kill deer to save trees

Honestly, I tried to come up with a better lede, but couldn't.

I'd like to clear cut and shoot every last fuckwit popularizing that spelling. The word is LEAD and the story itself is a text book example of how not to write a news story.

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#375 2018-01-31 11:32:59

choad wrote:

GooberMcNutly wrote:

Ann Arbor cutting down trees to kill deer to save trees

Honestly, I tried to come up with a better lede, but couldn't.

I'd like to clear cut and shoot every last fuckwit popularizing that spelling. The word is LEAD and the story itself is a text book example of how not to write a news story.

I've always used it in it's journalistic context in order to not conflate it with the other definitions of "lead".

But I agree, that story was written by an ignoramus. Starting paragraphs with "But" indeed...

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#378 2018-02-06 22:01:35

GooberMcNutly wrote:

I've always used [lede] in it's journalistic context in order to not conflate it with the other definitions of "lead".

But I agree, that story was written by an ignoramus. Starting paragraphs with "But" indeed...

Lede is usually employed by self important twats who are, more than not, employed editors who can't write their way out of paper bags. My first challenge as a reporter was learning to write tamper-proof leads; change one word, the story falls apart. Change what follows, the lead doesn't work.

The referenced story circled its subject until your head spun but none of this really matters. News reporting is not something you can teach and anymore, the least sensible career choice imaginable.

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#379 2018-02-06 22:02:00

GooberMcNutly wrote:

I've always used [lede] in it's journalistic context in order to not conflate it with the other definitions of "lead".

But I agree, that story was written by an ignoramus. Starting paragraphs with "But" indeed...

Lede is usually employed by self important twats who are, more than not, employed editors who can't write their way out of paper bags. My first challenge as a reporter was learning to write tamper-proof leads; change one word, the story falls apart. Change what follows, the lead doesn't work.

The referenced story circled its subject until your head spun but none of this really matters. News reporting is not something you can teach and anymore, the least sensible career choice imaginable.

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#380 2018-02-07 08:02:17

choad wrote:

The referenced story circled its subject until your head spun but none of this really matters. News reporting is not something you can teach and anymore, the least sensible career choice imaginable.

It's all going to the robots soon. They will consume the police, finance and court blotters, summarize the content, extract the sensational and prepare the feeds. Lord help us all.

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#382 2018-03-07 13:42:00

These people that sort of live somewhere on the fuzzy edge of the law, on either side, are subject to this type of treatment.  Not saying it's right but this is not a recent change in behavior by LE.

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#383 2018-03-09 17:31:59

A New Mexico police officer with a history of being reprimanded for on-duty crashes filed a lawsuit against a woman whose 6-year-old son was killed when the officer slammed into their vehicle while speeding to a crime in progress.

..

Following the wreck, the Albuquerque Police Department released to the Albuquerque Journal newspaper a list of five on-duty crashes and one unauthorized pursuit McDonnell had been involved in since 2009 in which he was reprimanded. He was suspended in three of the incidents, according to the report.

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#384 2018-03-09 17:37:07

GooberMcNutly wrote:

A New Mexico police officer with a history of being reprimanded for on-duty crashes filed a lawsuit against a woman whose 6-year-old son was killed when the officer slammed into their vehicle while speeding to a crime in progress.

..

Following the wreck, the Albuquerque Police Department released to the Albuquerque Journal newspaper a list of five on-duty crashes and one unauthorized pursuit McDonnell had been involved in since 2009 in which he was reprimanded. He was suspended in three of the incidents, according to the report.

Are you fucking kidding me?  Can I go slap that bitch ass officer until he cries?

WTF is that kind of behavior?

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#385 2018-03-09 17:37:10

A coffee shop in Oakland is refusing to serve law enforcement officers for the "physical and emotional safety of our customers and ourselves," according to the shop's social media.

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#386 2018-03-09 17:49:14

GooberMcNutly wrote:

A coffee shop in Oakland is refusing to serve law enforcement officers for the "physical and emotional safety of our customers and ourselves," according to the shop's social media.

They've broken the trust.

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#387 2018-03-10 17:07:21

Emmeran wrote:

GooberMcNutly wrote:

A New Mexico police officer with a history of being reprimanded for on-duty crashes filed a lawsuit against a woman whose 6-year-old son was killed when the officer slammed into their vehicle while speeding to a crime in progress.

..

Following the wreck, the Albuquerque Police Department released to the Albuquerque Journal newspaper a list of five on-duty crashes and one unauthorized pursuit McDonnell had been involved in since 2009 in which he was reprimanded. He was suspended in three of the incidents, according to the report.

Are you fucking kidding me?  Can I go slap that bitch ass officer until he cries?

WTF is that kind of behavior?

Forget about it, Jake.  It's Chinatown New Mexico.

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#389 2018-03-23 05:56:28

Missing: Criminal Justice Data

By AMY BACHMARCH 21, 2018

Criminal justice data in this country is hard to come by. It can be messy and difficult to understand. And in many cases, the data doesn’t exist at all.

How many people are in jail? For what crimes? For how long? Are people in jail mostly awaiting trial? Are they there for being unable to pay bail of $500 or less? You might think we know the answers to these basic questions, but we don’t.

Missing data is at the core of a national crisis. The United States leads the industrialized world in incarceration. With nearly 5 percent of the planet’s population and almost a quarter of its prison population, the country has invested a tremendous amount of money in the corrections system without the statistics necessary to tell us whether that money is actually reducing crime, improving fairness or lessening recidivism. State and federal spending on corrections has grown more than 300 percent over the past 20 years — becoming one of the fastest-growing line items in state budgets.

No credible business would ever make this kind of investment without being able to gauge its success. Moreover, we’ve all come to expect transparency when it comes to how the important institutions in our lives — our schools and hospitals, for example — are performing. Data-driven decision-making is the norm there, as it should be for criminal justice.

Why don’t we have better criminal justice data? Because justice in this country is primarily local. The United States has over 3,000 counties, and each county has multiple agencies that record data, each in its own way. There is no common language, and there are no standard definitions. Worse, the data is notoriously difficult to get. The result? No one can make informed policy decisions to improve public safety, reduce costs or identify patterns of inequity.

But all of this is beginning to change. Two weeks ago, Florida legislators passed a bill that would make the state’s criminal justice system the most transparent in the country.

The bill, which is expected to be signed into law by Gov. Rick Scott, requires the state’s 67 counties to collect the same data, record it in the same way and store it in the same public place. The state is to set up a repository that will house data that covers arrest to post-conviction and will be collected and reported by court clerks, state attorneys, public defenders, county jails and departments of correction.

The legislation is a common-sense measure, but it’s also a huge step forward. At my organization, Measures for Justice, we have been collecting criminal justice data from all over the country for six years. We go agency by agency to collect the data, much of it stored in an antiquated fashion. What we often notice is missing and incomplete data.

What’s more, agencies often fail to make full use of the data they have, despite constantly receiving data requests from professionals in and out of the system who seek to make improvements. At times, we have found that the public data is so hard to get — dispersed among multiple agencies, in multiple formats — that it is in essence unavailable.

But when we have all the data, we can begin to address aspects of the criminal justice system that might well merit reform. In Florida, for instance, we will now be able to see who is being assigned bail and for what kind of charges. We’ll get information on whether cases involving poor defendants have outcomes different from those of cases involving more affluent defendants.

The state will also collect data on ethnicity, which will show how Latinos, the largest ethnic group in Florida, are being treated by the criminal justice system. And for a more accurate picture of recidivism, it will collect data on whether probation and parole revocations are due to technical violations or to arrests for a new offense. The law mandates that everything will be published in a “modern, open, electronic format that is machine-readable and readily accessible to the public” on the state Department of Corrections website.

Information should be available to everyone. It can’t be limited to a small group of local professionals, who themselves have only access to an incomplete database or old documents in the basement of a county building. Florida’s lawmakers have recognized the need to let the sunshine in and get this right. Other states might enjoy the light as well.

Amy Bach is the executive director and president of Measures for Justice.

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#390 2018-04-03 14:32:04

The House of Mouse checks in:

Jackson said her issue isn’t with the policy but “how they treated us after that point.”

“I’m mad because of how they treated me and my children … The fact that they felt they needed AR-15s to escort us out.”

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#391 2018-04-22 15:58:02

Dead men tell no tales but apparently their corpses can be used to subvert biometric security.

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#392 2018-04-23 08:31:45

The apple was handed out in a plastic Delta Air Lines bag. Ms Tadlock said she did not remove it from the bag, instead putting it in her baggage for the second part of her journey to Denver, Colorado.

When the apple was found, Ms Tadlock told the agent that she had just received it from the airline and asked whether she should throw it out or eat it.

Instead the agent handed her a $500 fine.

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#394 2018-04-23 11:57:47

Well that is just reward for being a complete dick in life.

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#395 2018-04-23 12:15:13

Canadian authorities should drop charges against a 19-year-old Canadian accused of “unauthorized use of a computer service” for downloading thousands of public records hosted and available to all on a government website.

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#396 2018-04-25 16:13:00



Somebody I would have forgiven them for shooting...

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#398 2018-04-26 15:58:15

Are you fucking kidding me?!?!  They prayed and sprayed and killed a bystander.  Those fuckers shot so fast they didn't have time to aim, I can't begin to list the things wrong with this situation.  It's time for some house cleaning at the top.

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#399 2018-04-26 16:23:42

"Officer Involved" sure is cleaner than saying "Shot by cop".

Still, 20 minutes without an ambulance?

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