#1 2016-06-03 20:42:11

Anyone here know much about this? I took my Flossy to the vet because her lymph nodes were swollen and she has lymphoma. I started chemo with her today and it lasts for 19 weeks. They say that it usually puts them in remission for 12 to 18 months.

What I am wondering is if there is any kind of diet that could lengthen her remission. The vet says no but I am not willing to give up that easily.

I am beside myself with grief, I will do anything to keep her around as long as possible. I love this dog more than any being in the world.

Fuck I hate being sad.

Offline

 

#2 2016-06-03 21:44:44

Very sad to hear.  Hard to say if these types of afflictions are environmental, dietary, or genetic inbreeding. 

We grind raw game meat...usually moose,  caribou or salmon whatever remains after butchering/trimming...or when folks clear out freezers at the beginning of a new season. 

Our recipe:  Bake organic eggs, organic sweet potatoes, and combine with raw meat of choice (preferably wild game). 
Grind ingredients, include egg shells, into tub.  Occasionally, we sprinkle in some Dinovite.  Measure out appropriate servings in ziplock bags and freeze until needed.  We do a few months at a time.   

Dehydrated organ meat makes an excellent treat.  Frozen organ pieces, taken like vitamins, good for most creatures...up to and including hominids.

Large bones with marrow...bake low heat.  Canines content themselves for hours gnawing on these.   

A friend sends moose bones (for broth) to a cancer patient he knows...evidently something to it,  as the guy has been in remission for a number of years. 

You can control diet at this point.  I'm suspect of the food chain...for humans or pets. 

Good luck.

Last edited by JetRx (2016-06-03 21:55:16)

Offline

 

#3 2016-06-03 23:06:37

Bigcat wrote:

Anyone here know much about this? I took my Flossy to the vet because her lymph nodes were swollen and she has lymphoma. I started chemo with her today and it lasts for 19 weeks. They say that it usually puts them in remission for 12 to 18 months.

What I am wondering is if there is any kind of diet that could lengthen her remission. The vet says no but I am not willing to give up that easily.

I am beside myself with grief, I will do anything to keep her around as long as possible. I love this dog more than any being in the world.

Fuck I hate being sad.

Buy a puppy for her to train for you - allow her that honor.

Offline

 

#4 2016-06-03 23:34:58

Pet personalities are almost as variable as human, from rabid assmunch to docile oven mitt. I wouldn't get a pup for an ailing dog.

Online

 

#5 2016-06-04 00:09:07

choad wrote:

Pet personalities are almost as variable as human, from rabid assmunch to docile oven mitt. I wouldn't get a pup for an ailing dog.

You can't deny that the energy of youth has a helpful effect on the infirm and that happiness is far more important than longevity.  I trust he can pick a close matching personality from a litter and that his current pet wouldn't want him left alone to start from scratch. 

It's a family thing.

Offline

 

#6 2016-06-04 04:06:58

I'm really sorry to hear that, guy. It's the one major drawback of keeping dogs. JetRX has a good recipe that you could even add some brown rice to. Em has some good advice, depending on the two dog's personalities it might have a positive effect.
I hope you both feel better.

Offline

 

#7 2016-06-04 07:04:37

Take a look at some of the macrobiotic diets recommended for human cancer patients.  Modifications will be needed for sure.  Brown rice is in pretty much all of them.

Outside that, I'm very sorry to hear this - sometimes it's harder to lose an animal than a human.

Offline

 

#8 2016-06-04 07:12:06

BC, I too am sorry about Flossy and that you are going through this.  I have a friend who had non-Hodgkin lymphoma about 40 years ago.  At that time, she says the bombarded her with a lot of radiation.  She went protein heavy, with anything that she had an appetite for.  You may have the same challenge -- finding what Fluffy will eat.

My wife has been through chemo twice, the first time more than 22 years ago.  That is to say, there is reason to be hopeful.  Depending on the cocktail, it can be relatively mild at first, and the unpleasant reactions tend to build up.  The bad stuff happens for the first week after chemo, and then gradually gets better.  White cell counts may drop sharply, and there are meds that can help bring them back up, but they can be extremely expensive.

On the question of getting a puppy, I would think that a puppy would not know to leave Fluffy alone when rest is needed.

God, it is weird to be serious and empathetic here.

Offline

 

#9 2016-06-04 07:57:43

Thanks for all of that.

We have two Pits that we rescued so I probably won't buy a puppy. One of them is pretty young so she gets some youth experience there. She tolerates the newcomers pretty well and is the only dog I have ever had that wasn't rescued from a kill shelter. I probably will not bring any more new comers home so I can focus on Flossy.  ( I keep a steady stream of 2 or 3 dogs that are facing execution and need a home, A kindness that I would NOT afford most people sorry to say)

Her appetite is good and I will try the menu that Jet mentioned. Is the meat left raw and mixed with the cooked ingredients or mixed and then all cooked?

The chemo for dogs is a bit different than for people. They are more focused on quality of life during a remission period than destroying every cell so she most likely will not even get sick. I slept beside her last night to make sure there were no issues and all is well as of this morning.

I am looking for a way to get her remission to last for another 25 or 30 years instead of 12 to 18 months because I can't imagine her not being here and would gladly trade places in a minute with her.

Offline

 

#10 2016-06-04 08:00:38

It's good to hear that she has a pack, my recommendation was based on thinking she was an only dog.

Hang tough big guy and take good care of your friend.

Offline

 

#11 2016-06-04 14:10:31

Run raw meat through a grinder with the other (cooked) ingredients.  Tall Paul mentioned brown rice.  We used it for a time but one of our dogs appeared to be allergic to grains.  If Flossy hasn't had issues, add some. 

Don't forget big leg bones.  Cut into sections.  They're full of marrow.  Frozen raw is best (won't splinter).  You can slow boil it out as well...though it takes a while.

A little fish oil occasionally.  Too much =  diarrhea. 

In the same situation, we'd be just as worried and doing the same thing.  Hope all goes well.

Last edited by JetRx (2016-06-04 14:11:55)

Offline

 

#12 2016-06-04 15:22:29

JetRx wrote:

Run raw meat through a grinder with the other (cooked) ingredients.  Tall Paul mentioned brown rice.  We used it for a time but one of our dogs appeared to be allergic to grains.  If Flossy hasn't had issues, add some. 

Don't forget big leg bones.  Cut into sections.  They're full of marrow.  Frozen raw is best (won't splinter).  You can slow boil it out as well...though it takes a while.

A little fish oil occasionally.  Too much =  diarrhea. 

In the same situation, we'd be just as worried and doing the same thing.  Hope all goes well.

Thanks.

Offline

 

#13 2016-06-04 16:30:21

I'm sorry you and Flossy are going through this, and hope the treatment is successful. As for anyone feeling weird about  empathy, get over it.  All of us are here because we know most humans are worthless scum and don't give a rat's ass what misfortunes they suffer,  However, all of us have in our lives (I hope) beings worthy of our love and respect.

Offline

 

#14 2016-06-24 03:11:39

Cat-Dawg,

Hope the Flossie Lassie is still at your side.  Being the drunken dumbass I am, forgot forward this
For wild game bones, this is the ticket.  A good friend,living nearby, was complaining his new pup was dragging monster bones on his deck.   I'm sure they'd process and ship...provided you're going that route. 

Be glad to assist any way at all.  I know a couple employees and worked with the owner's son at one time.  In fact, two of my friends living down that way, regularly get the call for roadkill moose...

Offline

 

#15 2016-06-24 09:45:32

JetRx wrote:

Cat-Dawg,

Hope the Flossie Lassie is still at your side.  Being the drunken dumbass I am, forgot forward this
For wild game bones, this is the ticket.  A good friend,living nearby, was complaining his new pup was dragging monster bones on his deck.   I'm sure they'd process and ship...provided you're going that route. 

Be glad to assist any way at all.  I know a couple employees and worked with the owner's son at one time.  In fact, two of my friends living down that way, regularly get the call for roadkill moose...

Wow! Thanks a lot! I definitely will contact them and get some heading my way.  She has not lost any weight from the chemo thanks to your suggestions. The only things I haven't been able to get are the wild game bones

Flossy is doing pretty well with the chemo. Energetic and playful. A few times a week she wakes me up in the middle of the night by dropping her slobbery ball on my chest to go out and play. She has always done this, the difference now is that I go out and throw it for her no matter what time it is instead of waiting until morning.

Thanks again for your help and concern.

Offline

 

#16 2016-06-24 19:41:01

I am in radiation oncology and a believer in the classic treatments. However, I ran across a very beautiful girl several years back that had Hodgkin's Lymphoma. MD Anderson had given her months to live so she wanted to go to Oregon where this guy administered marijuana oil for cancer patients. I scoffed at the very idea of it, pissed her off and missed my chance for some last guy ever lovin. I still see her around every once in a while and she says she is in remission from the oil. I would tend to call bullshit on her entire story at this point but I'm hearing about this effective treatment more and more. I still won't say it's a cure, but damn it, throw a dart if you have to. I wouldn't know the correct dosage for a dog by the way, but if he orders pizza you are probably in the window.

Offline

 

#17 2016-06-24 21:23:41

Banjo wrote:

I am in radiation oncology.....

Do you shoot patients with proton beam guns, shove radioactive needles up their ass or just leave them in a room with dangerous isotopes? I've been teaching English to needle-meisters for many years now.

Offline

 

#18 2016-06-24 21:59:50

Hang in there.  Hope she does too.

In the last six months, I've said goodbye to two cats after 18 years. I know the feeling.

Last edited by sigmoid freud (2016-06-24 22:13:59)

Offline

 

#19 2016-06-24 22:11:46

sigmoid freud wrote:

Hang in there.  Hope she does too.

Thanks

Offline

 

#20 2016-06-25 08:52:07

Tall Paul wrote:

Banjo wrote:

I am in radiation oncology.....

Do you shoot patients with proton beam guns, shove radioactive needles up their ass or just leave them in a room with dangerous isotopes? I've been teaching English to needle-meisters for many years now.

Hey, don't knock it until it's cured your cancer, like it did mine.  I'm not saying it didn't suck just about as bad a anything sucked in all my life, but I'll still wager that letting the tumor grow until it killed me would've sucked a bit more.
P.S.  I really hope your dog does OK, Bigcat.  She sounds like she's enjoying life right now.

Last edited by George Orr (2016-06-25 08:53:16)

Offline

 

#21 2016-06-26 18:53:54

George Orr wrote:

Tall Paul wrote:

Banjo wrote:

I am in radiation oncology.....

Do you shoot patients with proton beam guns, shove radioactive needles up their ass or just leave them in a room with dangerous isotopes? I've been teaching English to needle-meisters for many years now.

Hey, don't knock it until it's cured your cancer, like it did mine.  I'm not saying it didn't suck just about as bad a anything sucked in all my life, but I'll still wager that letting the tumor grow until it killed me would've sucked a bit more.
P.S.  I really hope your dog does OK, Bigcat.  She sounds like she's enjoying life right now.

He's a fucking dumb ass, George. Don't let him get to you. He certainly doesn't bother me. I have had many arguments with anti-cancer treatment people and they are all the same. Let him enjoy his bone mets one day until the tumor is pressing on his spinal cord. Then he can friend me.

Offline

 

#22 2016-06-26 19:27:21

Banjo wrote:

George Orr wrote:

Tall Paul wrote:


Do you shoot patients with proton beam guns, shove radioactive needles up their ass or just leave them in a room with dangerous isotopes? I've been teaching English to needle-meisters for many years now.

Hey, don't knock it until it's cured your cancer, like it did mine.  I'm not saying it didn't suck just about as bad a anything sucked in all my life, but I'll still wager that letting the tumor grow until it killed me would've sucked a bit more.
P.S.  I really hope your dog does OK, Bigcat.  She sounds like she's enjoying life right now.

He's a fucking dumb ass, George. Don't let him get to you. He certainly doesn't bother me. I have had many arguments with anti-cancer treatment people and they are all the same. Let him enjoy his bone mets one day until the tumor is pressing on his spinal cord. Then he can friend me.

Ha! Only a po-faced schtupwhistle would bridle at describing brachytherapy 'shoving radioactive needles up your ass'. Besides, it prevents me from saying even worse things, like suggesting to Big Cat that when hunters come to ask to shoot on his land he leer at them and whisper "Only if I get to keep ALL the bones......." through a demented rictus.
Local game processors (and there must be some) might also be a good supply for those.

Offline

 

#23 2017-04-13 09:27:43

Life fucking sucks.

I hate humans.

I would step over 1000 people to save 1 dog.

Offline

 

#24 2017-04-13 10:15:46

Sorry about your dog, Bigcat.

S'why I don't have cats anymore. Losing them tears me apart.

Online

 

#25 2017-04-13 12:18:49

To ease any pain she is going through, I would suggest Cannabis.  I kept my old Familiar Mr. Nick alive for another year when he developed stomach/bowel cancer.  A bit in the morning, 1/2 hour before feeding.

Give her all your love, which I am sure you are doing.

Offline

 

Board footer

high-street.org